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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 1331, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info

Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


Thanks for driving less!

Portland carbon emissions down 35% per person

People walking, driving and taking streetcars 1949(March 31, 2015)  While carbon emissions in the U.S. have gone up 7 percent since 1990, Portlanders have been able to cut total emissions by 14 percent, even while absorbing 30 percent more people and adding over 75,000 jobs.

One of the ways we’ve been able to achieve this is because Portlanders are driving less. Yet transportation of goods and people still accounts for nearly 40 percent of Multnomah County carbon emissions. How we move around makes a difference, and land use patterns make a difference on how we move around.

Portland was the first U.S. city to adopt a plan to cut carbon in 1993. That plan put Portland and Multnomah County on a path to reach a 40 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030 and an 80 percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050 (based on 1990 levels). The 2015 draft Climate Action Plan builds on accomplishments to date with ambitious policies, new research and engagement with underserved communities.

According to the plan, 60 percent of Portlanders are currently being served by “healthy connected neighborhoods” that support the health and well-being of residents. Healthy connected neighborhoods afford people of all ages and abilities safe and convenient access to the goods and services needed in daily life – grocery stores, schools, libraries, parks, and jobs – reachable by foot, bike or transit. Forty percent of Portlanders still live in neighborhoods that lack safe and convenient access to transit, commercial services, jobs, or in many areas such as East Portland, even sidewalks. Addressing this inequity is one important piece of the plan.

The draft 2015 Climate Action Plan has been released for public comment and can be viewed here - http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/49989. Public comments are due by April 10.

 

UPDATED Traffic Advisory: Street improvements to close lanes on SW Columbia St from SW Broadway to Naito Parkway April 21 and 22

Update (April 20, 2015) – To complete this project, PBOT crews are scheduled to pave this stretch on Tuesday, April 21 and Wednesday, April 22,  7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lane closures will be in effect during those times. This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.


(April 3, 2015) - The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures on SW Columbia Street from SW Broadway to SW Naito Parkway from Tuesday, April 7 through Monday, April 13 7 a.m. through 5 p.m. each week day. 


The lane closures will allow crews to prepare the road surface to pave .96 lane miles.

PBOT street improvement crews work in almost all weather conditions, adjusting tasks based on conditions. Crews will grind down old asphalt and prepare street surfaces for paving even in cold and rainy weather. They will return to complete paving during a window of dry weather.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City's transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

News Release: PBOT to clear abandoned publication boxes; offer new ways to free up sidewalk space, tidy up publication boxes

(April 8, 2015) – The Portland Bureau of Transportation this month is beginning to clear sidewalks of abandoned publication boxes as part of a larger program - shaped with input from local media outlets, neighborhoods and businesses - to improve maintenance of boxes in the public right of way.

Abandoned publication boxThe new rules, adopted by the City Council earlier this year, help clean up public sidewalks for better pedestrian access and the beauty of the public right-of-way, while maintaining availability of publications. These major changes are being implemented on city streets:

  • Abandoned publication boxes: The new rules give Transportation Bureau staff the authority to remove empty boxes that have become a public nuisance. Crews will tag those boxes with a 30-day sticker, remove them after that time period, and recycle or dispose of them after 90 days, if not reclaimed. The public is encouraged to report abandoned boxes via publicationboxes@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-3467.
  • Clean and tidy freestanding boxes: Publication boxes that are in operation must be clean, free of graffiti, in good working order and be placed in a way that doesn’t impede pedestrians. Media outlets will have until July 1 to adjust and comply with the new regulations.
  • New, co-located publication boxes: Eleven co-located boxes are being added to Portland sidewalks, expanding a 2012 pilot program that introduced four such structures around Pioneer Courthouse Square.The co-located boxes can house multiple publications in a single metal box, saving valuable sidewalk space and offering an organized appearance to public space. Neighborhood associations and business districts may apply for a co-located publication box in their area to create a central area for dispersing several publications.

“Streets and sidewalks are shared community spaces that Portlanders love, but they must be maintained,” Transportation Director Leah Treat said. “This new program gives the public a new way to alert us when they see problem publication boxes and it empowers PBOT staff to help address problem areas more effectively. We are inspired by the pride Portlanders take in their public spaces and we are eager to support community initiatives.”

New co-located publication box at City HallThe program stems from months of discussions with PBOT staff, publication leaders and local neighborhood and business associations. Recommendations from a stakeholder committee led City Council to change City Code to address regulations for publication boxes in the right-of-way while still protecting the freedom of expression.

Portland City Council amended City Code 17.46 in January, expanding the code for publication boxes from the downtown mall to citywide. The new standards took effect in February.  For additional information, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/publicationbox.

Co-located publication box locations in Downtown Portland:

Co-located publication boxes in Downtown Portland

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Neighborhood Greenway sign identification project

New signs help road users identify they are on a Neighborhood Greenway.

(April 14, 2015) PBOT crews have begun installing signs on four of Portland's Neighborhood Greenways to help people better understand the type of road they are using. Neighborhood Greenways are low-speed, low-traffic streets where people walking and bicycling are prioritized over cut-through automotive traffic. 

PBOT has nearly 80 miles of Neighborhood Greenways in all parts of the city. While the program has changed since it first emerged as a citizen-led effort to identify SE Salmon and SE Taylor as a designated bicycle route, Neighborhood Greenways share several characteristics:

        • Automotive speeds are low. In most cases the signed speed limit is 20 MPH.
        • Automotive volumes are low. PBOT strives for less than an average of 1,500 cars per day and many Neighborhood Greenways have less than 1,000 cars per day.
        • Crossings of major streets are improved for people walking and bicycling across.

The new signs help provide context for the 20 MPH speed limit signs, reinforcing Neighborhood Greenway routes as places for walking and bicycling and encouraging those uses. Keep an eye out for the new signs on the following Greenways:

• N Michigan,
• N/NE Blandena /Going /Alberta,
• SE Salmon /Taylor, &
• SE Bush /100th/101st

A total of 95 signs will be installed. As funding permits, the signs will be added to other Neighborhood Greenways, phased in gradually over time.  These signs can also be included in the design of new Neighborhood Greenways.

neighborhood greenway id signs

Learn more about Portland's Neighborhood Greenways by visiting - http://www.neighborhoodgreenways.org

Traffic Advisory: Spring paving to close lanes on SW Capitol Highway from SW Nebraska Street to 200' south of SW 26th Avenue on April 18

(April 15, 2015)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures on SW Capitol Highway from SW Nebraska Street to 200’ south of SW 26th Avenue on Saturday, April 18 from 7 a.m. through 5 p.m.

The lane closures will allow crews to complete paving .58 lane miles.

Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation