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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 1331, Portland, OR 97204

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Advisory: Timbers' fans: Consider TriMet, biking, walking to March 7 and all home games; event rate parking in effect

(March 2, 2015)  – With the first Timbers’ home game starting at 7:30 p.m. March 7, the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation is asking Timbers fans to consider their transportation options for all games this season in order to keep streets and transit running smoothly.

Fans are encouraged to take TriMet or walk or bicycle. Ample temporary bicycle parking is available at Providence Park.  People who drive are encouraged to park in one of the City’s SmartPark garages.

Event rate pricing of $3.50 per hour will be in effect at area parking meters from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Regular parking rates of $1.60 per hour will apply at other times. 

Northwest neighborhood event Zone M permit parking restrictions also will be in effect from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Event-goers are encouraged to check out transportation and parking information at www.trimet.org and www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/timbers or visit www.portlandoregon.gov/smartpark.

 Go Timbers!

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

It’s a wrap on the 2014-15 Fix-It Fair season

3 fairs, 100 bikes, and many great community connections

(March 2, 2015)  During the 2014-15 Fix-It Fair season Active Transportation and Safe Routes to School engaged in over 300 conversations with neighbors, students and families about their transportation options and biking and walking to school, including several in Spanish.  We also prepared 60 riders for biking year-round at our All-Season Cycling classes and helped provide adjustments and tune ups for 100 bikes.

volunteer mechanics from Bikes 4 Humanity & Bike Farm

Common bike repairs included fixing flat tires, shifting and braking adjustments, brake pad replacement, drivetrain maintenance, and other miscellaneous adjustments like raising seats, tightening training wheels or adjusting headsets. All repairs were provided to help low-income families and students get back on the road for trips to school, to work and for errands.

Bike mechanics from Bikes for Humanity and Bike Farm and other volunteers donated over 100 hours to help bring this free service to Fix-It Fair attendees. “It’s definitely a group effort and we couldn’t do it without everyone pitching in – especially our amazing mechanics! We are so lucky to have them donating their time and resources to these events,” said Abra McNair, Active Transportation and Safe Routes to School staffer.

We hope to continue bringing these great services to the Fix-It Fair community when the events start up again in November. Until then, the Community Resource Guide is available online year-round with the type of information you’ll find at a Fix-It Fair. And if your bike needs work, check out this list of classes, shops and organizations that can help you learn to fix it yourself.

Traffic Advisory: Winter paving to close lanes on NW Front Avenue from NW 61st to NW Kittridge avenues March 7 and 8

(March 5 2015)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures in industrial Northwest Portland this weekend.  The lane closures will be in effect on NW Front Avenue from NW 61st Avenue to NW Kittridge Avenue Saturday, March 7and Sunday, March 8, from 7 a.m. through 5 p.m. each day.

The Kittridge Bridge will be closed on Sunday from 7 a.m. thru 3 p.m. A detour will be in place on NW 26th Avenue.

The lane closures will allow crews to pave 3.33 lane miles.   The weekend was chosen for this work to minimize disruption to businesses  in this heavily industrial area.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible. Access will be maintained for businesses during the project.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Traffic Advisory: Sewer repair to close lanes on N Marine Drive at the Leadbetter Loop March 6 to 9

Sewer repair to close lanes on N Marine Drive at the Leadbetter Loop March 6 to 9

(March 6 2015)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements will require lane closures on N Marine Drive between the North Leadbetter Road loop from March 6 to March 9, all hours, all days. 

The westbound right lane on N Marine Drive will be closed as will the eastbound right lane. The turn lane on N Marine Drive westbound into N Leadbetter Road will be closed, however the road will be accessible from the west end intersection.

The lane closures will allow crews to conduct sewer repairs.  The lanes are scheduled to reopen on Tuesday, March 10.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions, and use alternate routes if possible. Access will be maintained for businesses during the project.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

News Release: Legislature hears plea for safety cameras pilot program on Portland’s High Crash Corridors

(March 9, 2015) -- The House Transportation and Economic Development Committee heard testimony today on legislation that would authorize the City of Portland to create a pilot program for unmanned photo radar safety cameras on its urban High Crash Corridors.

The City of Portland is seeking this authority to combat the frequent serious and fatal crashes on these roadways, and to educate and encourage safer driving by the traveling public. The 10 designated High Crash Corridors make up just 3 percent of the City’s road network, but they account for more than 50 percent of pedestrian fatalities in Portland.

House Bill 2621 is sponsored by Representative Jeff Reardon, whose district includes parts of East Portland that are crisscrossed by several High Crash Corridors.

“I am deeply saddened by the number of traffic fatalities in East Portland each year,” Rep. Reardon said. “My hope is that House Bill 2621 will keep our community safe by reminding drivers that when they speed on these high-crash corridors, they put their neighbors' lives at risk.”

The committee heard testimony from Kristi Finney-Dunn, whose son was killed on SE Division Street, one of the streets where cameras could be placed if the bill passes.

“On August 12, 2011, my son Dustin was killed one of Portland’s High Crash Corridors,” she said. “Since that day, I have been a traffic safety advocate, fighting for transportation safety measures like HB 2621 to save other families from the pain mine has suffered.”

Mary Lee Turner, retired rehabilitation instructor for the Oregon Commission for the Blind, said cameras could improve safety by leading more motorists to follow the speed limit.

“As a lifelong legally-blind pedestrian in our community, it is increasingly critical that all people -- motorist, pedestrians, and cyclists -- using public roads know and abide by the laws. That’s why I’m testifying in support of HB 2621, so that we have the greatest chance of safety for everyone.”

Commissioner Steve Novick, who oversees PBOT, said the cameras are an important safety measure the legislature should allow Portland to try.

“Speed kills. The likelihood that you will die if you are hit by a car is directly related to how fast the car is going,” Novick said. “This is one tool that we can use to slow people down and reduce the number of traffic deaths and injuries.”

Leah Treat, the Director of the Portland Bureau of Transportation, testified to the committee, sharing her commitment to eliminating serious and fatal crashes from city streets. At her direction, PBOT has adopted the goal of eliminating all traffic fatalities, an approach known as Vision Zero.

“Speeding is a top contributing factor to fatal crashes in Portland metro region, second only to DUII,” Treat said. “Many cities, including Seattle to our north, and Chicago and Washington, D.C. where I served previously, are successfully using unmanned photo radar to curb dangerous speeding. I feel it is an important tool to change behavior, improve safety, and reduce fatalities and serious injuries on our roads.”

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