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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 1331, Portland, OR 97204

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Media Relations

Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


News Advisory: Annual Portland Aerial Tram evacuation exercise set for Sunday, October 4 from 9 a.m. to noon.

Interagency team led by Portland Fire & Rescue to evacuate seven people

(Oct. 1 2015) – The annual evacuation exercise for the Portland Aerial Tram is set for Sunday morning, Oct. 4, 2015. The exercise will begin at 9 a.m. and should be concluded by noon.

Members of the Portland Fire & Rescue Technical Rescue Team will lead the exercise. They will be assisted by representatives from both the City of Portland, whose Bureau of Transportation owns the tram,  and Oregon Health & Science University, which operates the tram in conjunction with Doppelmayr USA.

Using ropes and harnesses, the team will lower seven volunteers playing the role of passengers 100 feet to the top floor of the OHSU Casey Eye Institute’s parking garage. 

The training allows crews to practice an aerial rescue in the event the tram is stopped for an extended period of time with passengers on board. If members of the public contact you with questions about the training, please inform them that this is a scheduled training exercise and not a real emergency.

The exercise has been conducted annually since the Portland Aerial Tram opened on Jan. 27, 2007 and is designed to provide personnel with experience in executing a last resort safety measure.  There has never been a real emergency.

More than 7,000 daily commuters and tourists ride the Portland Aerial Tram; the tram is one of only two used for urban transit in the U.S.

 

WHEN:  9 a.m. Sunday, Oct.4, 2015 - The exercise should be completed by noon.

WHERE:  The training will take place above the OHSU Casey Eye Institute parking garage. At that location a small number of exercise participants will be evacuated from the tram and lowered via ropes and harnesses down to the top of the parking structure. Local news crews are encouraged to cover the training, but we ask that you do so from the ground and refrain from entering the Casey Eye Institute parking lot so as not to interfere with the exercise.

SPECTATORS:  The Portland Aerial Tram is closed on Sundays during the fall and winter. As a result, the training exercise will not interfere with regular operations. For those interested in observing, please do so from nearby locations and refrain from entering the Casey Eye Institute parking lot. 

 

ABOUT THE PORTLAND AERIAL TRAM

The Portland Aerial Tram is owned by the City of Portland’s Bureau of Transportation and operated by OHSU.  It opened to the public on Jan. 27, 2007. The cabins, named Walt and Jean, travel 3,300 linear feet between the South Waterfront terminal adjacent to the OHSU Center for Health & Healing and the upper terminal at the Kohler Pavilion on OHSU's main campus. Traveling at 22 miles per hour, the tram cabins rise 500 feet for the three-minute trip over I-5, the Lair Hill neighborhood and the Southwest Terwilliger Parkway. Visit http://gobytram.com . Find the tram on Twitter @PortlandTram  and Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/portlandaerialtram

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Celebrate Walktober!

Enjoy a walk this month - or lead a walk for others to enjoy

Walktober logo(October 2, 2015)  Walktober is three weeks of walking fun in October! Oregon Walks developed Walktober to help people in the Portland region find new ways to walk, new places and to walk and new people to enjoy walking with. Walktober is an open calendar which means that anyone can join a walk or create, post and lead a walk. Walks are put on by people like you!

Do you have an idea for a walk, but not sure how to make it happen? Walktober provides a Walk Guide to help you out. The guide lists some ideas or themes to get you started as well as guidance on the more practical considerations. Once you have your idea and plan your walk, just provide the information on their Add Event page and the calendar will automatically update.r to help people in the Portland region find new ways to walk, new places and to walk and new people to enjoy walking with. Walktober is an open calendar which means that anyone can join a walk or create, post and lead a walk. Walks are put on by people like you!

Oregon Walks is a non-profit advocacy organization dedicated to promoting walking and making the conditions for walking safe, convenient and attractive throughout the Portland metropolitan region. The organization advocates for better laws, enhanced enforcement, more sidewalks and signed crosswalks, education programs, community improvements designed for pedestrians, and increased funding to support these activities.

Hey Portland – let’s celebrate Walk+Bike to School Day!

Students and Commissioner Novick walk to school(October 5, 2015)  On October 7, students across Portland and across the globe will be participating in International Walk and Bike to School Day. Is your child’s school registered?

International Walk+Bike to School Day is a global event that involves communities from more than 40 countries walking and biking to school on the same day. Started in 1997, this event has become part of a movement for year-round safe routes to school and a celebration – with record breaking participation – each October. Today, thousands of schools across America – from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico – participate.

Students at Vestal School offer prizes for walking/bikingPortland’s nationally recognized Safe Routes to School program works to make walking, biking and rolling to and from school safer and easier for Portland students and families. A partnership of the City of Portland, schools, neighborhoods, community organizations and agencies, the Safe Routes program continues to make a significant difference for students and families’ safety and health.

Since its inception in 2005, the Portland Safe Routes program has made impressive gains in increasing the number of students walking and biking to school. Starting with eight elementary partner schools in its first year, the program has expanded year after year and now serves over 100 elementary, K-8 and middle schools across five school districts and reaches over 40,000 students. Portland Safe Routes will pilot its first high school program this year. These efforts have yielded impressive returns. Today, 43.6% of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike, an increase of 35% from when the program began. Thanks to the Safe Routes program, trips to school in Portland are on foot 33% and on bike 9%, compared to 12% walking and 1% biking rates nationally.

News Advisory: Join Portland’s Safe Routes to School Program on Oct. 7 for a celebration of success on International Walk and Bike to School Day

(Oct. 5, 2015) On Wednesday, October 7, Commissioner Steve Novick, Portland Public Schools Board Member Mike Rosen, Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat and other local dignitaries will join students and staff from Lent K-8 School in celebration of International Walk and Bike to School Day and the success of Portland’s Safe Routes to School program.

WHO:

Commissioner Steve Novick

Portland Public Schools Board Member Mike Rosen

Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat

Other local dignitaries

Students and staff from Lent K-8 School

WHAT:

In celebration of the progress made in getting more students to walk and bike to school, the Safe Routes to School program of the Portland Bureau of Transportation is organizing a media event at Lent K-8 School on International Walk and Bike to School Day. Since its inception in 2005, the Portland Safe Routes program has made impressive gains in increasing the number of students walking and biking to school. The program now serves over 100 elementary, K-8 and middle schools across 5 school districts and reaches over 40,000 students. Today 43.6 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike, an increase of 35 percent from when the program began.

WHEN:

7:45 am – Dignitaries arrive at Bloomington and Lents Parks (see list below)

7:55 am – Families arrive at Parks

8:00 am – Walking School Buses and Bike Trains leave for school

8:15 am – Ceremony in Lent School courtyard

8:30 am – Bell rings for school

WHERE:

Dignitaries/staff at Lents Park (playground on corner of SE 92nd and Steele):

Commissioner Steve Novick

Director Leah Treat

Mike Rosen (PPS School Board)

Dignitaries/staff at Bloomington Park (on corner of SE 100th and Steele):

Dr. Jeff Stanley (Kaiser)

Elizabeth Engberg (Kaiser Thriving Schools)

Capt. Kelli Sheffer (Portland Police)

Steph Noll (Bicycle Transportation Alliance)

Margaux Mennesson (SRTS National Partnership)

Cory Poole (NW Skate Coalition)

Lent K-8 School, 5105 SE 97th Ave

 

VISUALS: 

News media can join dignitaries, students and staff at either Lents or Bloomington Park and walk with them to Lent K-8 School. Dignitaries and students will participate in Walking School Buses and Bike Trains as they walk or bike to Lent School. Lent is a Title 1 school and has a diverse student body, with the majority of students representing communities of color. Dignitaries will give short remarks at a special program in the Lent School courtyard prior to the 8:30 a.m. school bell.

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News Release: Portland celebrates 10 years of walking and biking to school on International Walk and Bike to School Day

43.6 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike

 

walking to school(Oct. 7, 2015) – On Wednesday, October 7, Commissioner Steve Novick, Portland Public Schools Board Member Mike Rosen, Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat and other local dignitaries joined students and staff from Lent K-8 School in celebration of International Walk and Bike to School Day. Participants also celebrated ten years of PBOT’s Safe Routes to School program successfully making walking and biking to school safer and easier for Portland students and families.

Since its inception in 2005, the Portland Safe Routes program has made impressive gains in increasing the number of students walking and biking to school. Starting with eight elementary partner schools in its first year, the program now serves over 100 elementary, K-8 and middle schools across 5 school districts and reaches over 40,000 students. The program will pilot its first high school programs this year.

Today 43.6 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike, an increase of 35 percent from when the program began ten years ago. Thanks to the Safe Routes program, 33 percent of students walk to school, 9 percent bike and 1.6 percent roll. Nationally, the numbers are much lower with 12 percent of students walking and 1 percent biking.

“Thanks to our community partnerships, we have a created a nationally recognized Safe Routes to School Program that has inspired thousands of Portland students and families to regularly bike, walk and roll to school,” said Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick. “Though we’re exceeding national Safe Routes participation rates, we know that biking and walking to school is not a viable option in neighborhoods without sidewalks, bikeways and improved crossings. I’ll continue to work hard to secure the resources to make needed infrastructure improvements so that families can safely walk and bike throughout all Portland neighborhoods.”

biking to school“PPS loves Portland’s Safe Routes to Schools Program because it guarantees that every student that wants to walk or ride their bike to school can get there safely,” said Portland School Board Member Mike Rosen, “That makes for healthier kids and a healthier planet.  We very much appreciate the Bureau of Transportation’s wise and generous investment in our kids. Lent K-8 is a school that takes the health of our students and the planet very seriously.  Whether they and their community volunteers are growing food for the school and community to eat in their on campus garden or they are providing free weekly bike repairs to all students, this community gets the connection between a healthy school and a healthy neighborhood.”

“We’re here to celebrate the incredible successes of Safe Routes to School, but there is still much more we are working to accomplish,” said Transportation Bureau Director Leah Treat, “In the next ten years, we want to increase the number of Portland area students getting to school by foot, bike or bus to 75 percent. We want to engage our city’s high school students as leaders on school transportation issues affecting youth. And we want all students across Portland have the opportunity to learn to navigate safely around their neighborhoods by bike.”

Lent K-8 School has been a long-standing partner of the Portland Safe Routes to School program, joining the effort in 2007. The Safe Routes program teaches Lent 2nd graders pedestrian safety skills every winter and provides 10 hours of hands-on bike safety instruction to 4th and 5th graders each spring. The school has been the recipient of federal grant funds administered by ODOT, which have improved pedestrian crossings to the school. Lent is a Title 1 school and has a diverse student body, with the majority of students representing communities of color.

In addition to Lent K-8 School, 70 Portland area schools representing 33,000 students will be holding events today in celebration of International Walk and Bike to School Day. International Walk and Bike to School Day is a global event that involves communities from more than 40 countries walking and biking to school on the same day. Started in 1997, the event has become part of a movement for year-round safe routes to school and a celebration – with record breaking participation – each October.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation. To learn more about PBOT’s efforts to encourage bicycle use and make safer routes for bicycling, see the bureau’s Active Transportation web site.