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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 1331, Portland, OR 97204

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Dylan Rivera

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503-823-3723

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News Release: Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, PBOT Director Chris Warner, Prosper Portland Director Kimberly Branam and Gateway community members cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project

cutting the ribbon

Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, Transportation Director Chris Warner, Prosper Portland Executive Director Kimberly Branam cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project with Gateway community members. Photo by Sarah Petersen, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Fixing Our Streets Logo

(July 18, 2019) Members of the Gateway community, the city’s Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) Director Chris Warner, and Prosper Portland Executive Director Kimberly Branam gathered today to cut the ribbon on the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project and celebrate the transformation of the Gateway Regional Center’s retail core.

The Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project has brought to life a vision first outlined in the Opportunity Gateway Concept Plan, approved by city council back in early 2000. The plan envisioned a future for the Regional Center in these terms:

Groups of people can be seen moving in and out of buildings, sitting in outside cafés, jogging on streets, and celebrating community events at the Gateway Station Plaza. Day and night, the area buzzes with activity. Cars still stream through the area, actually in greater numbers than before. Yet ironically it doesn’t feel that way. On-street parking buffers pedestrians from street traffic, new street connections have dispersed cars, traffic lights are coordinated, and accidents have been reduced by 90%. The traffic level feels safe and under control.

The Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project has now made this vision a reality, through a joint project with Prosper Portland and by coordinating several other PBOT projects in the neighborhood.

Before and After: 111th and Weidler

Before and after: Waiting for the bus and taking a bike ride along NE Weidler Street at 111th Avenue is a completely different experience following the completion of the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project. Photos by Google Streetview (left) and Pierre Haou, Portland Bureau of Transportation (right).

New curb extensions and marked crosswalks, new rapid-flashing beacons and better lighting already make crossing the street a more comfortable experience throughout the business corridor. The new, bright-green parking-protected bike lanes along Halsey and Weidler provide an extra buffer from vehicle travel lanes. And we’ve added more on-street parking.

PBOT crews installed new streetlights with their own unique design and made the sidewalks wider to make more room for benches, bicycle racks, trash cans, and other street furniture. And they turned NE 103rd Avenue between NE Halsey and Clackamas streets into a “festival street” that can be closed to traffic for community events and which serves as a bookend to the corridor’s west entrance.

106th and Halsey

Pedestrians cross at the new rapid flashing beacon at NE 106th and Halsey. Photo by Pierre Haou, Portland Bureau of Transportation.

Today, Gateway neighbors gathered to celebrate at the eastern end of the corridor, the second bookend known as the “East Entry Triangle,” a new public plaza bordered by NE 112th Avenue, Halsey and Weidler that formerly sat vacant.

“These streets belong to all of us, and everyone has the right to feel safe whether they are walking, biking, or rolling on them,” said Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly. “I am so pleased that not only does the Halsey Weidler Streetscape Plan bring safety to the forefront with improved pedestrian crossings and reduced speeds, it creates a new public plaza, and will help local businesses in the Gateway District.”

“Get ready, Gateway! This Sunday, over 20,000 people will bike, walk, and roll through this neighborhood for the Outer Northeast Sunday Parkways,” said Transportation Director Chris Warner. “It’s going to be fun to see so many people experience what we already know and love about the Gateway neighborhood – it’s diverse community, it’s charming business district, and – now - it’s fantastic sidewalks, public plazas, bike lanes, and neighborhood greenways.”

“The completion of the Halsey Weidler Streetscape Project marks a milestone in Prosper Portland’s strategic goals to pursue transportation improvements in East Portland that contribute to job growth, increase connectivity, and complement the Gateway Action Plan,” said Kimberly Branam, Executive Director of Prosper Portland.

“Our children enjoy riding their bikes to the new Gateway Discovery Park and now we can ride safely to Gateway Green as a family, thanks to our new bicycle lanes and greenways,” said Lisa Ortquist, a neighborhood resident and mother of three children aged 10 to 24 who has owned her business, Ortquist & Associates, PC, at NE 112th Avenue and Halsey Street for the past 20 years. “And on days when there’s no school, my kids can now safely walk to get breakfast, ice cream and treats at the neighborhood shops.”

People attending Outer Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways this weekend will get to walk or ride a new 4.8 mile route featuring the WALK with Refugees and Immigrants. The new route will cross the newly improved Halsey-Weidler corridor at NE 106th Avenue at the northeastern entrance to Gateway Discovery Park which opened last summer.

These improvements are just some of the numerous transportation projects underway or coming soon to the Gateway area this year:

The $5.5 million Halsey-Weidler Streetscape project was funded by PBOT’s Fixing Our Streets program, Prosper Portland, transportation system development charges, and the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services’s “% for Green” program.

Learn more about Fixing Our Streets by using our interactive map of projects at http://map.fixingourstreets.com.

Additional information about transportation projects coming to the Gateway community and East Portland can be found at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/east.

News Blog: Central City in Motion bus and bike improvements to be showcased at July 23 open house

Six featured projects will make it easier to get around our growing central city

CCIM open house

(July 19, 2019) Thousands of bus and bike trips through the central city will soon be safer, easier, and more reliable thanks to transportation improvements coming this summer and fall.

Next Tuesday, July 23, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) will host an open house in Old Town to share information about these efforts. Members of the public are invited to stop by the White Stag building at 70 NW Couch St. anytime between 5-7 p.m. to meet with PBOT and TriMet staff, learn about projects nearing construction, and weigh in on projects going into design.

PBOT will be sharing data from the recently completed bus and bike lanes on SW Madison Street as well as discussing a new Business Access and Transit (BAT) lane on NW Everett Street scheduled for installation next month and a new dedicated bus lane on the Burnside Bridge coming this fall. The bureau will also share plans for improvements on NW Flanders Street, Naito Parkway, and SW Fourth Avenue. Open house attendees will also learn about PBOT’s current study focused on making transit better across the city.

Now is a great time to try leaving your car at home for your next downtown trip. Taking transit, biking, using a scooter, or walking and rolling as a pedestrian are all great ways to save money, help decrease congestion, and reduce our individual impact on climate change. PBOT, TriMet, and Portland’s bike-share program BIKETOWN will all be giving out discounts and gear to help get you started.

Many of the projects featured at the open house were identified through the Central City in Motion plan. Central City in Motion is PBOT’s guide for investing in our streets to create a smart, future-focused transportation system in the central city. These investments aim to make the entire system work better and provide more predictable travel times for businesses and residents.

NW Everett rendering

In August 2019, a new business access and transit (BAT) lane will replace one of the existing travel lanes on NW Everett Street and run from NW Broadway to the Steel Bridge ramp. The ramp from southbound NW Naito Parkway to the Steel Bridge will close. This will improve transit reliability and access to the Rose Quarter, benefitting Portlanders who ride TriMet lines 4, 8, 16, 35, 44, and 77.

The July 23 open house will focus on projects slated for construction from 2019 to 2021, including:

 

Click here to RSVP on Facebook

Refreshments and activities for kids will be provided. For questions about the event, email Gabe Graff at gabriel.graff@portlandoregon.gov or call 503-823-5291.

PBOT News Release: Portland Sunday Parkways hits Outer East Portland this Sunday, in conjunction with Portland Parks & Recreation’s 2019 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants

A celebration of New Portlanders from across the globe

Smiling children who participated in the 2018 walk

Participants in the 2018 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants. Courtesy Ben Brink and Portland Parks & Recreation. 

(July 19, 2019) – Outer Northeast Sunday Parkways, the third event of the Sunday Parkways season, will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 21. This free, family-friendly event, organized by the Portland Bureau of Transportation and presented by Kaiser Permanente, is a great way to get the whole family out on a bike ride, walk or dance in a park.

The 4.8-mile, car-free route links four parks with live music, exercise classes, food and interactive performances and exhibits. Thousands of people come to each Sunday Parkways, where we open the city's largest public space - its streets - to show everyone how they can walk, bike, and roll, while fostering civic pride, stimulating economic development, and engaging community.

This Sunday's event welcomes the 2019 Walk with Immigrants & Refugees.

People at the 2018 Walk with immigrants

Participants in the 2018 Walk with Refugees & Immigrants. Courtesy Mick Hangland-Skill and Portland Parks & Recreation.

The third annual walk is presented by Portland Parks & Recreation's Parks for New Portlanders program, local nonprofits and refugee and immigrant organizations, and local elected leaders. The event celebrates the unique experiences of Portlanders of all ages and backgrounds. An estimated 5,000 people took part in the walk in 2018.

All are welcome to take part, to support and celebrate with everyone who calls the Rose City home. Speakers at the start and at the conclusion of the walk will include diverse community leaders sharing and reflecting on the experience of immigrants in the Portland area. Afterwards, enjoy delicious food, multicultural music, and family fun at Knott Park.

“In our current political climate, events like the walk on Sunday are vital for our entire community," said Transportation Commissioner Chloe Eudaly. "The City of Portland will never tell refugees and immigrants to ‘go back where you came from’ because this is your home. Portland is a sanctuary city and Portlanders support, defend, and celebrate our refugee and immigrant communities.”

The walk starts at 11 a.m. at the East Portland Community Office, 1017 NE 117th Ave. and finishes at Knott Park, 1 mile away, at NE 117th Avenue and Knott Street.

Sunday Parkways is excited to continue its partnership with the Parks for New Portlanders (PNP) program to help connect immigrants and refugees with parks and community-building activities across the city.

For more information in English and several other languages, please visit the website for the walk.

children on bicycles

Children on bicycles cool off by riding under a water mister at Sunday Parkways in 2017 in Outer East Portland. Photo by Kevin Koch for PBOT.

 

Learn more about recent and upcoming improvements coming to the Gateway area of East Portland

Learn about a variety of new and upcoming transportation projects for the Gateway area at a PBOT open house at Gateway Discovery Park, at NE 106th Ave and Halsey, where staff will provide information, visuals and refreshments during Sunday Parkways

Sunday's event offers a great introduction to recently opened biking and walking amenities in the Gateway area. 

The route will cross the newly improved Halsey-Weidler corridor at NE 106th Avenue at the northeastern entrance to Gateway Discovery Park, which opened last summer.

Catch a bus or the MAX light rail to TriMet's Gateway Transit Center, where you can ride to NE Weidler Street, where PBOT recently completed new curb extensions and marked crosswalks, new rapid-flashing beacons and better lighting that make crossing the street a more comfortable experience throughout the business corridor. New, bright-green parking-protected bike lanes along Halsey and Weidler provide an extra buffer from vehicle travel lanes.

These improvements are just some of the numerous transportation projects underway or coming soon to the Gateway area this year:

 

The former 7-mile Outer East Sunday Parkways route has been shortened this year to 4.8 miles to make for a more walkable route and now includes John Luby Park and Hazelwood Hydro Park. This showcases a walkable and rollable network of streets connecting four parks in all: Knott City, John Luby, Hazelwood Hydro, and Gateway Discovery.

View the route map to plan your route to or through the Outer East Sunday Parkways, and see locations of restrooms and other resources.

View the brochure to learn about some of the activities planned at each park this Sunday.

For more information, visit www.PortlandSundayParkways.org or call 503-823-7599. Follow us on Facebook at PortlandSundayParkways,  Instagram @PortlandSundayParkways and on Twitter @Sunday Parkways.

 

Check the Sunday Parkways route map if you're traveling in the Gateway area on Sunday

Map of 2019 Outer East Sunday Parkways route

Logos of event sponsors

 

About Sunday Parkways

Sunday Parkways is a series of free community events opening the city's largest public space—its streets—for people to walk, bike, roll and discover active transportation. The events are beloved by Portlanders of all ages. Total attendance to date has been 789,035 over 40 Sunday Parkways events. Residents and visitors say they come to enjoy the traffic-free streets connecting parks and schools filled with activities, music and vendors. It’s safe, family-friendly and a chance to meet neighbors. Learn more at PortlandSundayParkways.com

About PBOT

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation 

 

Learn more about recent and upcoming improvements coming to the Gateway area of East Portland

PBOT News Advisory: Crosswalk education and enforcement action planned for E Burnside Street at E 16th Avenue on Wednesday, July 31

Raising awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws

Vision Zero Portland logo(July 29, 2019) – The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Portland Police Bureau (PPB) will conduct a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action on Wednesday, July 31, at the marked crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue, from noon to 1:30 p.m. to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws.

Under Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk, whether it is marked or unmarked. People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane. 

The crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue has a marked crosswalk, median island and signage.  In addition, “stop here” signage and stop lines indicate where drivers stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk, making all travelers more visible. Southeast 16th Avenue is a designated neighborhood greenway one block south, starting at SE Ankeny Street. The surrounding area includes businesses, residences and schools, with elementary, middle and high schools within a half mile. Buses for TriMet lines 12, 19, and 20 travel through this intersection and serve the surrounding community.

Changes are coming next year to the crossing at 16th Avenue. Improvements include rapid flashing beacons funded by the Fixing Our Streets (FOS) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program. Design is underway and scheduled for Fall 2020 completion. Other safety improvements along W/E Burnside can be found at PBOT’s Vision Zero webpage.

East Burnside, a Vision Zero designated high crash network street, had a total of 543 crashes, including two fatalities and 745 injuries from 2013 to 2017, the most recent five-year period for which data are available for the area from the Burnside Bridge to the city limits.

The most common cause of crashes resulting in death or serious injury to people walking is when they are walking legally and struck by a person driving who fails to stop. People driving can do their part by having more patience, driving at or below the posted speed, continuously scanning the environment looking for people walking and bicycling, and being ready to stop as needed. PBOT reminds Portlanders to watch for people walking at all hours of the day or night, and that it is illegal to drive in the center turn lane.

East Burnside at 16th Avenue

East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue (looking east). Image by Google.com

Education and enforcement actions such as the July 31 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to achieve Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating all traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Each crosswalk enforcement action involves a designated pedestrian crossing at a marked or unmarked crosswalk while police monitor whether people driving, bicycling and walking adhere to traffic safety laws. Drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk and pedestrians who fail to follow Oregon traffic laws may be issued a warning or citation. A PBOT staff member will serve as the designated pedestrian crossing the street during Wednesday’s action.

Crosswalk education and enforcement actions are an effective way to communicate traffic laws to people driving and walking. The transportation and police bureaus do education and enforcement actions in response to requests by community members, city traffic safety engineers, and Portland Police to educate the general public on the rules at marked and unmarked crossings.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for crossing streets in Oregon (in English; Español); and view the results of previous actions.

Portland is committed to ending traffic violence in our communities. Through the Vision Zero program, the City of Portland and our partners are working to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our streets.

To request a Vision Zero community briefing, enforcement action in your area, or any non-urgent traffic safety concerns, call the 823-SAFE Traffic Safety Hot Line at (503) 823-7233, or submit a non-urgent Traffic Safety Hot Line request at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/79389

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

 

News Blog: Pedestrians over age 65 at greater risk of dying in Portland traffic crashes

In the last five years, adults ages 65 or older made up 26% of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland

Vision Zero Portland logo

(July 30, 2019) Older adults make up an increasingly large proportion of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland based on an analysis of crash data since 2010. 

In the last five years, adults ages 65 or older made up 26% of pedestrian traffic deaths in Portland, compared to 16% in the prior 5-year period:

Pedestrian Deaths age 65+ Portland

 

Older adults make up approximately 12% of Portland’s population, indicating that they are increasingly overrepresented in pedestrian deaths.  

People 65 and older make up 16% of total traffic deaths in Portland since 2010. 

“Our streets need to serve everyone, including people who are older and can no longer drive safely,” says Bandana Shrestha, Community Engagement Director for AARP Oregon. “Aging in place can be a wonderful option, but it becomes much harder where people must navigate wide, fast streets that lack convenient and safe crosswalks.” 

Older pedestrians particularly vulnerable  

 

A majority of older adults killed in Portland crashes since 2010 were walking or using a mobility device at the time of their death:

ped deaths portland

 

This finding aligns with state and national data. In Oregon, adults over age 50 were 64% more likely to be hit and killed while walking compared to people under 50 according to a recent analysis supported by AARP. Across the U.S., pedestrians age 70 and older have the highest per capita death rates. Incidence of older pedestrian deaths has been attributed to several factors. This includes when older pedestrians don’t have adequate space or time to cross the street at a slower pace, when older pedestrians have difficulty identifying safe gaps in which to cross traffic, or because older pedestrians are more fragile.

National data also show that pedestrian deaths have increased 51% from 2009 to 2018 at the same time that they fell in Europe. The surge in pedestrian deaths may be related to the increasing prevalence of SUVs, which are twice as likely to kill pedestrians in a crash. 

“Every traffic death is a tragedy, but it’s especially alarming to see so many older adults dying in crashes,” says Chris Warner, Transportation Director. “This is another reminder that we need to keep designing and managing our streets with the most vulnerable people at the top of our minds and creating a safe street system, and that we all need to look out for each other when traveling.” 

 

Safe speeds especially important for older adults 

Travel speed is a key predictor of traffic crashes and injury severity, and becomes even more important with age. A 30-year-old pedestrian hit at 40 mph has a 36% chance of dying, while a 70-year-old’s chance of death is nearly double that, at 70%. 

Speed is a leading contributor to traffic deaths in Portland and a focus of the city’s Vision Zero work to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. 

Since 2017, PBOT has: 

  • Lowered speed limits on residential streets to 20 mph and reduced speed limits on an additional 121 miles of street
  • Installed eight automated speed safety cameras at high crash locations and expects to install more cameras as soon as next year. 
  • Launched the citywide Struck campaign in 2018 and renewed the campaign for 2019. 

In addition to protecting pedestrians, focus areas for Vision Zero include designing streets to protect human lives and creating a culture of shared responsibility. PBOT's newly adopted PedPDX Plan describes additional tools and actions to improve pedestrian safety. 

This work will become even more critical as Portland grows older and more grandmas, grandpas, retirees, and other older adults share the city’s streets, requiring care and patience on the part of all travelers. 

 

Every intersection is a legal crosswalk

Under Oregon law, EVERY intersection is a legal crosswalk, whether it is marked or unmarked. People driving must stop and stay stopped for people walking when the pedestrian is in the travel lane or the adjacent lane.

The most common cause of crashes resulting in death or serious injury to people walking is when they are walking legally and struck by a person driving who fails to stop. People driving can do their part by having more patience, driving at or below the posted speed, continuously scanning the environment looking for people walking and bicycling, and being ready to stop as needed. PBOT reminds Portlanders to watch for people walking at all hours of the day or night, and that it is illegal to drive in the center turn lane.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Portland Police Bureau (PPB) will conduct a crosswalk safety education and enforcement action tomorrow, Wednesday, July 31, at the marked crossing on East Burnside Street at 16th Avenue, from noon to 1:30 p.m. to raise awareness of pedestrian safety and Oregon traffic laws.

Education and enforcement actions such as the July 31 event are a key part of the City of Portland’s citywide effort to achieve Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating all traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

Learn more about rights and responsibilities for crossing streets in Oregon (in EnglishEspañol); and view the results of previous actions.

Portland is committed to ending traffic violence in our communities. Through the Vision Zero program, the City of Portland and our partners are working to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our streets.

To request a Vision Zero community briefing, enforcement action in your area, or any non-urgent traffic safety concerns, call the 823-SAFE Traffic Safety Hot Line at (503) 823-7233, or submit a non-urgent Traffic Safety Hot Line request at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/79389


Data details: 
The analysis includes all reported crashes that occurred within the City of Portland (including highways) from 2010 through July 30, 2019. Data from 2010 through 2017 is from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Data from 2018 through July 30, 2019, is preliminary data from the Portland Police Bureau. View more information about Portland crash data.