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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 1331, Portland, OR 97204

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Dylan Rivera

Public Information Officer

503-823-3723

For breaking news from Portland Bureau of Transportation see our Twitter feed: @PBOTinfo

For breaking news on overall service disruptions in the Portland-Vancouver metro area, go to @publicalerts or see www.publicalerts.org 


A Look Back: Changing the landscape of accessibility in East Portland

Before and After photos of SE Flavel Street Sidewalk Improvements

On SE Flavel Street (pictured above), new sidewalks make it safer to walk to the MAX Green Line, the I-205 Multiuse Path, the Springwater Corridor as well as shops and restaurants on 82nd Avenue. (Photo by Portland Bureau of Transportation)

This blog post is the third installment of “A Look Back”, a column that examines Fixing Our Streets projects completed by the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT). This third piece will return to not just one project, but a series of projects that have changed the landscape of accessibility in Portland--Fixing Our Streets sidewalk improvements in East Portland.  

(Jan. 8, 2020) In just three short years, the Fixing Our Streets program has added sidewalks on several key routes, making it safer and more convenient for people to walk and access public transit.

These completed sidewalk projects are in East Portland and are focused on areas where there are known gaps in the sidewalk network. Using a data-driven Vision Zero approach to traffic safety, while also connecting people to popular destinations like transit stops, business centers, and schools is a key part of PBOT's long-term vision for Portland. According to the Vision Zero Crash Map, since 2008, the majority of pedestrian deaths and injuries have occurred in East Portland (Click here to view the map).

First identified in the East Portland in Motion plan as having strong community support, these sidewalk projects were made a reality when voters approved Fixing Our Streets in 2016, a 10-cent gas tax to rebuild our roads and make them safer. The projects include:NE 148th Avenue: from Halsey to Glisan Street, SE Flavel Street: from 84th to 92nd avenuesSE 112th Avenue: from Market Street to Powell Boulevard, and NE 102nd Avenue: from Sandy Boulevard to I-84.

Fixing Our Streets Logo

On SE Flavel Street, new sidewalks make it safer to walk to the MAX Green Line, the I-205 Multiuse Path, the Springwater Corridor as well as shops and restaurants on 82nd Avenue.

Another location, 102nd Avenue, is one of the most dangerous streets in Portland for pedestrians. The NE 102nd Avenue sidewalk project provided a much-needed safety improvement. PBOT’s Vision Zero Action Plan ranks it in among the top 20 streets where pedestrians are killed or injured.  The sidewalk provides a seamless walking route between Prescott Elementary and the Gateway Transit Center.

Similarly, the new sidewalks on SE 112th Avenue improve walking connections along a large north-south corridor and connect destinations like Kelly Butte Natural Area, Floyd Light Middle School and Mall 205.

Finally, on NE 148th Ave from Halsey to NE Glisan streets, PBOT built a staggering 3000 feet of sidewalk (the equivalent of 15 downtown city blocks)! It filled critical gaps in the East Portland sidewalk network, creating a contiguous sidewalk along this important street. Nine corner ramps and fifteen driveways were also updated during construction to bring them up to current ADA standards. Thanks to Fixing Our Streets funding, Portlanders will have an easier and safer time reaching Halsey HydroPark, Glenfair Elementary and the TriMet bus stops on NE Halsey and Glisan Streets. 

Before and After photo of sidewalk improvements on Glisan Street

Before and after the 148th Sidewalk Improvements Project at the intersection of NE 148th Avenue and Glisan Street (Photos by the Portland Bureau of Transportation and Google Maps)

These projects, in total, created a full 2.75 miles of complete sidewalk network in East Portland!

Two big Fixing Our Streets’ sidewalk projects are going to construction in the coming months, both SW Capitol Highway: Multnomah Village to West Portland and N Willis Boulevard: Newman Avenue to Chautauqua Boulevard will start construction in Winter 2020. Several Fixing Our Streets funded Safe Routes to School projects will also go to construction in 2020, including: Steele Street: from 92nd Avenue to the I-205 path and SW Carson Street: from 14th to 17th Avenue.

The Fixing Our Streets program, paid for by a local gas tax approved by Portland voters in May 2016 and a heavy vehicle use tax, is Portland’s first local funding source for transportation. Fixing Our Streets is invested in street maintenance and safety improvements. The City Council ordinance included a project list that shows specific projects that are intended to be funded. The list of projects can be found at www.fixingourstreets.com.

Written by Pierre Haou, Portland Bureau of Transportation

Fixing Our Streets Banner

PBOT Travel Advisory: With snow in the forecast, prepare this weekend for next week's winter weather

PBOT crews are coming to work on Sunday to get ready

 

Are you ready?

 

Sasquatch Get Ready for Winter

(Jan. 10, 2020) With a variety of forecasts all calling for freezing temperatures and the potential for snow next week, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) urges the traveling public to get ready for winter this weekend.

PBOT crews will report to work on Sunday, to get equipment prepared for snow and ice response. Low temperatures could create slick conditions Sunday night at high elevations in the West Hills or East Portland. Snow or other winter precipitation could affect road and sidewalk conditions from Monday through Friday.

The public should be ready for the potential to telecommute or rely on public transit next week. The time to prepare yourself and your family is NOW! 

While the forecast is still unclear, there are some simple things all Portlanders can do to prepare themselves for winter weather.

 

While the forecast is still unclear, there are some simple things all Portlanders can do to prepare themselves for winter weather.

  • Make a checklist for your home, business, and/or vehicle. Property owners, tenants and businesses should have supplies on hand, such as ice melt and snow shovels to clear sidewalks as well as pathways across their driveways.
  • Everyone driving in Portland should carry snow chains and an emergency kit in their vehicle all winter long.
  • Create an emergency plan with your family or work colleagues that emphasizes telecommuting, public transit and emergency meeting locations for your commute. Check our Winter Weather Center to see the snow and ice routes nearest you.
  • Stock up on provisions such as food, water, clothes, and medications you, your family, your pets, or your business will need in case you are stranded by winter weather -- at home, or on the road in your vehicle.
  • Check in with vulnerable neighbors who may need help stocking up on supplies ahead of a storm or clearing their sidewalks afterward.
  • Know your elevation, and the elevation of areas you are traveling to and through. Check the interactive elevation map in the "Elevation, Weather and Traffic" section of PBOT’s Winter Weather Center to see if your area is located at 500 feet or 1,000 above sea level. Use PortlandMaps.com to look up any address in Portland and find the approximate elevation.
  • Worried about water pipes at your home or business? Winterize your building with tips from the Portland Water Bureau.

Learn about how Portland responds to winter weather, see winter weather travel tips and other essentials:
PortlandOregon.gov/Snow

 

City state plow routes screen shot

 

Do you know which streets PBOT plows in your area?
Check the maps on the Winter Weather Center:

PortlandOregon.gov/Winter

 

State Highways are maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation, for example: Powell Blvd, 82nd Avenue and SW Barbur Blvd


See Ask ODOT and check highway conditions before you go at TripCheck.com 

 

PBOT advises the public to be aware of forecasts, use caution, and delay your travel to avoid traveling during forecast snow or ice. Consider public transit, and check trimet.org/alerts and portlandstreetcar.org for service alerts before you go.

PBOT also reminds property owners, tenants and businesses that they are responsible for clearing sidewalks of snow and ice. It is important that sidewalks are clear so that people who are walking to transit and people with disabilities can move about safely.

In icy conditions, PBOT strongly advises delaying travel if possible. If people must travel, PBOT recommends taking public transit.

 

Zoom in on your travel route, see areas at 500 feet or 1,000 feet or higher in the

 

PBOT Winter Weather Center

 

Elevation Weather Traffic on Winter Weather Center

 

Use PortlandMaps.com to look up any address in Portland and find the approximate elevation

 

  • Stay informed. Sign up for PBOT alerts via text or email. Go to PBOT’s Winter Weather Center to track real-time weather, traffic, road closures and plow information. Sign up at Public Alerts for emergency notifications from all regional agencies via text, email or phone. 
  • Never abandon your vehicle in a travel lane, especially on rail tracks for Portland Streetcar and MAX light rail. If you choose to drive and your vehicle loses traction, pull over into a shoulder or legal parking space. You can call for a tow truck and remain with your vehicle. Or you can leave your vehicle legally parked and walk carefully to a public transit stop or other safe place.
  • Don't get towed! Any vehicle blocking a travel lane or otherwise creating a safety hazard is subject to citation, tow and impound. The cost of a citation and tow for abandoned vehicles preventing free passage is $206. This is in addition to the citation cost of a Class B traffic violation (ORS 819.100) with a presumptive fine of $270. Additional costs to store a towed vehicle longer than four hours is $28 per day.

 

PBOT’s Misson: In winter weather, our crews work around the clock on our designated snow and ice routes to make sure there is one passable lane in each direction as soon as possible after a winter storm.

This means that front wheel drive vehicles or vehicles with traction devices such as snow chains will be able to get through.

 

Traffic Advisory: Eastbound lane of West Burnside to remain closed at least several more days, as landslide risk lingers

 

crews work to clear debris beside West Burnside

On Friday, PBOT crews responded to a landslide on West Burnside, removing dump truck loads of debris and building a catchment wall to make it safer. The slide remains active, and more work is needed, so the eastbound lane remains closed. Photo by Dylan Rivera/ Portland Bureau of Transportation.

(Monday, January 27, 2020) – The eastbound lane of West Burnside will remain closed between Barnes Road and Skyline Blvd for at least several more days, as PBOT engineers and maintenance crews monitor the area of an active landslide. The traveling public is advised to avoid the area, and if eastbound travel through the area is needed, to follow a signed detour along SW Barnes Road and Skyline Blvd.

The landslide was first reported on Friday morning, and PBOT crews responded to close off the area to the public, remove dump truck loads of debris and build a catchment wall to make it safer.

During inspections today, engineers determined that debris had continued to fall from the slide over the weekend. The slide remains active, with cracks at the top of the scarp that indicate a threat to public safety.

PBOT is proceeding with plans to remove loose material from the top of the scarp. The bureau needs to obtain specialized equipment to clear the material at risk of sliding.

Please avoid the area if possible and expect delays. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

News Release: Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee unanimously endorses continuation of Fixing Our Streets investments, supports proposal for City Council to refer to May 2020 ballot

Business for a Better Portland, Oregon Walks, 1000 Friends of Oregon, Rosewood Initiative, The Street Trust, the Northwest District Association, Professional & Technical Employees Local 17, and the City of Portland’s Pedestrian and Bicycle advisory committees join growing endorsement list for referral

Fixing Our Streets proposed project map 2020-2024

Click to view an enlarged version of the proposed project map for Fixing Our Streets: 2020

(Jan. 28, 2020) After extensive outreach with leading Portland community organizations, advocates and committees, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) released their project list today for a continuation of Fixing Our Streets, the street repair and traffic safety program funded by a 10-cent fuel tax and the Heavy Vehicle Use Tax. This will be presented to Portland City Council on Feb. 6 for referral to the May 2020 ballot. A renewal of the Heavy Vehicle Use Tax will also be presented to City Council, to ensure that businesses with heavy truck activity pay their fair share for street maintenance and safety as well.

At the most recent Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee meeting, the committee voted unanimously to refer the list to council for inclusion on the May 2020 ballot. The proposed renewal and project list has already been endorsed by multiple groups, including Business for a Better PortlandOregon Walks1000 Friends of OregonThe Rosewood InitiativeThe Street Trust, the Northwest District AssociationProfessional & Technical Employees Local 17, as well as the Portland’s Pedestrian and Bicycle advisory committees, among others.

Since its passage, the Fixing Our Streets program has paved or improved 40 lane miles of road, constructed 300 new ADA ramps, updated 58 intersections for safety, and built 53 Safe Routes to School projects that serve a combined 31 elementary schools, eight middle schools and 10 high schools in Portland. It has also provided significant funding for major streetscape projects such as the Halsey-Weidler Streetscape Project in the Gateway neighborhood and the Foster Streetscape Project in Southeast Portland.

View an interactive map of upcoming and completed Fixing Our Streets (2016-2020) projects at map.fixingourstreets.com.

The program has also made major investments in the prosperity of minority-owned and emerging small businesses. PBOT has far exceeded the city’s goal for participation by Oregon’s Certification Office for Business Inclusion and Diversity (COBID)’s categories of disadvantaged, minority, women, emerging small business, or service-disabled veteran business enterprises. In the first three years of the Fixing Our Streets program, 40% of all contracting dollars were awarded to COBID-certified firms – double Portland’s citywide goal of 20% participation.

Building on the demonstrated success of the original Fixing Our Streets program, the bureau has developed a new list of $74.5 million in street repair and traffic safety projects and services.  The list includes $25 million dedicated to paving, $5 million for new traffic signals, $4.5 million for sidewalks, and $4.5 million for street lighting, and millions more for better and safer access to schools, transit, and community services for Portland’s kids, seniors, and families. Spending from the program will continue to be overseen by the Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee, which represents multiple communities with a stake in Portland’s streets and roads.

"As one of the co-chairs of the Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee, I am excited to endorse a referral to voters for reauthorization,” said Ashton Simpson, Community Asset Planner at The Rosewood Initiative. “Fixing Our Streets is helping to address the long unfulfilled promises made to East Portland for safer streets. I am grateful for the strong leadership of Commissioner Chloe Eudaly and PBOT Director Chris Warner. I hope the voters approve the measure in May, because there is much more work to be done!"  

Fixing Our Streets helps realize the safer, more mobile, and more sustainable Portland envisioned by the numerous plans and programs that direct PBOT’s work citywide, including: the Vision Zero Action Plan, PedPDX: Portland’s Citywide Pedestrian Master Plan, Safe Routes to School, and area plans like Southwest in Motion, Northwest in Motion.

The new Fixing Our Streets (2020-2024) project list builds on these plans and the extensive public input that informed them. It was also shaped by feedback from neighborhood stakeholders, transportation justice advocates, and business groups. The projects represent an expansion of what made the original Fixing Our Streets so successful: a relentless focus on repairs and improvements to make it easier and safer for all Portlanders to get where they need to go.

“Fixing Our Streets’ impact on Portland has been tremendous. We have invested millions in our Safe Routes to School network, repaired and repaved streets throughout the city, and expanded our walking and biking network with new sidewalks, neighborhood greenways, and protected bike lanes,” said PBOT Director Chris Warner. “Since its passage three and a half years ago, the bureau has worked internally to increase efficiencies, establish stronger project management protocols, and create better relationships with businesses and the greater Portland community. Fixing Our Streets has made us a more responsive bureau that is better equipped to take on new opportunities to further maintain and improve our city’s transportation system. We take the trust Portlanders have placed in us very seriously and are ready to deliver.”

“What’s clear is that these Fixing Our Streets improvements have created an appetite for more,” said Ashley Henry, Executive Director at Business for a Better Portland. “It’s obvious to anyone traveling through Portland that the street maintenance backlog is vast, and it’s devastating that we continue to set records for the number of Portlanders dying from traffic violence. We support the referral of a renewal of the gas tax as a dedicated funding source for maintenance and safety projects so that voters have the opportunity to extend the benefits of these investments to even more parts of the city.”

“Improving our active transportation infrastructure is a key part of addressing climate change, and of creating walkable, attractive, cohesive, and safe communities,” said Claire Vlach, Oregon Walks Plans and Projects Chair and Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee Member. “We support Fixing Our Streets, and hope Portland will build upon the funding measure’s successes to create a permanent revenue stream for transportation in the future.”

“This program is essential to making our communities safer, livable and sustainable,” said the Northwest District Association in their letter of support.

The Fixing Our Streets 2020-2024 program is divided into three primary categories - smoother streets, safer streets, and community transportation services. It also includes dedicated funding for a year-round pothole crew, for street lighting on High Crash Network streets, and for reducing speeds on cut-through routes.

Smoother Streets:

  • $25M for paving with a focus on preventative maintenance for busy and neighborhood streets

Safer Streets:

Community Transportation Services:

Basic Maintenance:

PBOT has heard again and again from neighborhoods and businesses that want us to be more responsive to routine maintenance requests like fixing potholes, repairing sections of failing road (base repair), and maintaining gravel streets.

  • $4M for base repair (repairing sections of failing streets) citywide
  • $4M for maintaining Portland’s gravel streets
  • $5M for a dedicated, year-round pothole crew

Basic Safety Improvements:

PBOT has several proven tools to significantly improve street safety. Establishing a citywide program for basic street safety services allows PBOT to deliver these services more responsively and efficiently.

  • $2M for speed reduction on cut-through routes
  • $4M for additional safety enhancements
  • $2.5M for Neighborhood Greenway retrofits
  • $2M for safer intersections

The original Fixing Our Streets proposal for street repair and safety was passed by voters in May 2016. It is projected to bring in more than $85 million – over $76 million from the fuel tax alone and an additional $8 million from the Heavy Vehicles Use Tax, passed by City Council concurrent with the 10-cent fuel tax approved by voters. The City will annually audit the Fixing Our Streets program. This audit will be shared with the oversight committee and the public. Spending from the program will be overseen by the Fixing Our Streets Oversight Committee representing the many communities with a stake in Portland's streets and roads.

View a detailed project list and learn more about Fixing Our Streets at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/fixingourstreets2020.

Traffic Advisory: PBOT to close all lanes on West Burnside Thursday through Sunday during daytime hours to remove landslide debris

Westbound lane to reopen at 3 p.m. daily

truck loads on west burnside

On Friday, PBOT crews responded to a landslide on West Burnside, removing dump truck loads of debris and building a catchment wall to make it safer. The slide remains active, and crews also removed debris on Tuesday. More work is needed to stabilize the landslide. Photo taken Jan. 24, 2020 by Dylan Rivera/ Portland Bureau of Transportation.

(Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020) – Starting tomorrow and continuing through Sunday, PBOT crews will implement full closures of West Burnside during daytime work hours, between SW Barnes Road and Skyline Blvd.

The closures are needed so crews can bring in specialized equipment to remove material at risk of continuing to slide in an area affected by a landslide that occurred last Friday. The slide has continued to be active in recent days.

The road will be closed to all traffic from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day. Crews will open the westbound lane to travelers each day by about 3 p.m. Westbound travel is anticipated to be allowed from 3 p.m., and overnight, until the full closure resumes the following day.

The full closures will continue each day through Sunday.

PBOT crews are hoping to reopen the road to all travel in all directions on Monday, Feb. 3, but the work is weather dependent and the schedule could change.

The traveling public is advised to avoid the area, and if travel is needed, to follow a posted detour along SW Barnes Road and Skyline Blvd to the south of Mount Calvary Cemetery. During full closures, eastbound and westbound traffic will be directed to the detour route.

The landslide was first reported on Friday morning, and PBOT crews responded to close off the area to the public, remove dump truck loads of debris and build a catchment wall to make it safer. Periodic closures have been in place since Friday.

During inspections, engineers determined that debris had continued to fall from the slide last weekend. The slide remains active, with cracks at the top of the scarp that indicate a threat to public safety. In the coming days, PBOT crews will remove loose material from the top of the scarp.

On Tuesday, crews cleared more debris that had fallen from the slope and was blocking stormwater in the area. They installed a stormwater pipe to improve drainage during the coming work in the area.

The work through Sunday will remove debris at risk of falling from the landslide. Eventually, the landowner and PBOT will likely need to return to the area for permanent improvements to stabilize the area.

Pipe besdie West Burnside

On Tuesday, PBOT crews installed a drainage pipe on the south side of West Burnside to conduct stormwater away from the area of a landslide that PBOT crews are working to clear. Crews spread the gray rock visible in this image to cover and protect the pipe. The yellow tape shows the eastern edge of the soil and vegetation that will be removed. Photo taken Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2020 by Portland Bureau of Transportation.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation