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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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Sunday Parkways makes a 'Big Jump' in East Portland this Sunday

PBOT News Release:

Outer Northeast neighborhoods looking to triple bike ridership over three years

(Aug. 17, 2017) – This Sunday, Aug. 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the City of Portland Sunday Parkways presented by Kaiser Permanente will host a brand new Sunday Parkways route in Outer Northeast Portland neighborhoods. This free, family-friendly event organized by the Portland Bureau of Transportation is a great way to get the whole family out on a bike ride or walk for healthy, fun activity, kicking off the second decade of Sunday Parkways.

Outer Northeast Sunday Parkways is part of PBOT’s effort to provide residents with greater options for walking and biking in the Gateway district.  In the next several years, the City of Portland plans to build nearly $20 million worth of biking and walking infrastructure to allow neighborhood residents to more easily connect to jobs, schools, parks, and local businesses.  With a three-year “Big Jump” grant from People for Bikes, Sunday Parkways route will showcase upcoming neighborhood greenways, crosswalks, and safety improvements in the neighborhood.  Learn more on PBOT’s “Gateway to Opportunity” project website.

The six-mile Outer Northeast Portland route includes sections of Neighborhood Greenways in the 130s corridor, and shows where new crossing are being built along NE Halsey and NE Glisan streets.

The route highlights four beautiful Portland Parks and goes by the University of Western States campus. Knott Park will have the Parks for New Portlanders Cultural Celebration.  Hazelwood Hydro Park is the starting point for the Walk with Refugees and Immigrants starting at 11 a.m. along the Sunday Parkways route from Hazelwood Hydro Park to Knott Park. Thompson Park will be strewn with hula hoops and a bouncy house where participants can pick up a Kaiser Permanente Passport to Health sticker hunt. Participants can get their Zumba on at East Holladay Park.

To make it easy for residents and visitors alike to join in the fun this weekend PBOT has created a detailed Sunday Parkways route map with all area bikeway routes and bus and light rails routes plus the BIKETOWN boundaries and stations to help area everyone get to Sunday Parkways by biking and taking transit.

All parks are packed with activities, food, music, and community businesses and organizations to connect with at the event.  Find the list of music, food, community organizations, sponsors and scheduled classes and activities on our Outer Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways webpage.

About Sunday Parkways

Sunday Parkways is a series of free community events opening the city's largest public space—its streets—for people to walk, bike, roll and discover active transportation. The events are beloved by Portlanders of all ages. Total attendance for the ten years has topped 690,000 over 38 Sunday Parkways events. Residents and visitors say they come to enjoy the traffic-free streets connecting parks and schools filled with activities, music and vendors. It’s safe, family-friendly and a chance to meet neighbors.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility.www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation

Guest Article: Dylan Rivera

Interview with Portland Artists

The story behind Sunday Parkway’s popular Parkways Putt Putt

What are your names?

Vicki Wilson** and John Larsen.

Do you two work independently or as part of a studio or business?

We are independent artists. Vicki has a Sculpture and Ceramics studio practice as well. John works

as a Web Designer and makes art and music.

What is the name of your business?

It's just us.

Why did you decide to take on this project?

I'm still not sure � Because we like being too busy to have normal lives.

How did this project come about?

Greg Raisman was a student in a hand-building ceramics class taught in my home studio. He asked

for a suggestion of an interactive art piece for the event and it came to mind immediately. Once the

idea was there, the next question was if we could also design and build it.

What made you pick Putt Putt as an interactive art installation?

John and I have been talking about different iterations of this kind of project for years, ever since we

were involved with Urban Golf and the Holocene Putt Putt events.

What is the connection to Portland?

It seemed like as we brain-stormed the holes a theme started to emerge. It seemed like an

appropriate theme and something that folks would enjoy.

How long have you lived in Portland?

John was raised in Tigard from infancy (and) I came to the Pacific NW 22 years ago.

What drew you to Portland?

I came from VCU in Richmond VA to study Art at Pacific NW College of Art, which is also where John

attended school.

 

What makes you stay in Portland?

Not sure. It's a funny place. It's a creative place. There is good food, coffee and beer. Gardens grow

well here.

What is your professional background?

Vicki was an adjunct professor of Art (Drawing/Design and Sculpture) at area colleges for the past 11

or so years. Not teaching college at this time, exploring other ways of living as an artist (public and

private commissions and studio work). John was the Art Director for Michael Curry Design for 7 of

his 10 years with them. Now he is the go to web guy for Drive Marketing Group. He makes music in

the spare bedroom studio and works on public art commissions with Vicki as a team.

Where can we find more of your work?

The Oregon Zoo, Oregon City Main Street, The City of St Helens, OR and the Lake Oswego Gallery Without Walls Program. We also started the Foster Powell Community Garden and are responsible for an intersection repair painting in Lents and for a community mural in Foster Powell. To see more of our work, check out our websites: www.vickilynnwilson.net and www.johnlarsen.net.

Find Parkways Putt Putt at Sunday Parkways Outer NE at East Holladay Park on August 20, 2017!

 ** Thank you Vicki Wilson for this wonderful interview! 

WALK with Refugees and Immigrants!

Walk for Refugees and Immigrants at Sunday Parkways Outer NE (August 20, 2017)

Welcome to Portland. Our population is shy of 600,000 and we are one of the fastest growing cities in the US. We are also one of the hottest destination spots for Immigrants and Refugees from across the globe. Statistically speaking: Oregon resettles more than 15,000 international migrants, and 11,000 interstate migrants, per year (Migration Policy Institute. 2010-2011). Portland proper resettles about 100 refugees (international migrants fleeing persecution) per month with about 1100-1400 new arrivals annually. Almost half of each Portland public school classroom goes home to an ethnic minority family (PPS Oct 2012) and 1-in-5 Portlanders are foreign-born. Portlanders are from around the US, territories, Vietnam, Britain, India, Mexico, Somali, Iraq, Russia, France, Ethiopia, Peru, China, Korean, El Salvador, Ukraine, Afghanistan and more. We are the 52nd biggest US city but we’re ranked 11th in refugee settlement. (State of Oregon DHS Refugee Programs Office, 2012).

In sum, we are well known across the country and the globe for our compassion. People are drawn to Portland for the same reasons they have always been from the very beginning: for the chance of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It also helps that moving to Portland means access to beautiful green spaces, a car-free or car-light lifestyle, and the introduction to tons of wonderful welcoming people.

In celebration of our New Portlander community, Parks for New Portlanders is partnering up with Sunday Parkways to organize a Walk with Refugees and Immigrants.  Community members and elected[GA1]  leaders will gather at East Portland Neighborhood Office and participate in a one-mile walk alongside our refugee and immigrant neighborhoods in a show of support. In partnership with refugee and immigrant organizations, this event plans to recognize the unique experiences and contributions of new Portlanders, of all ages and backgrounds by honoring seniors and providing school supplies for children.

Come join us in celebrating Portland and to welcome our New Portlanders!

  • The walk will start at 11 am from East Portland Neighborhood Office (near Hazelwood HydroPark - 1017 NE 117th, Portland, OR 97220)
  • At the end of the walk, enjoy diverse music, food and other family activities at Knott Park while also getting the chance to hear refugee and immigrant stories from 12 – 4 pm.  

We invite all neighbors, faith-based organizations, local businesses, board members, neighborhood associations, and non-profits to join us on this walk to inspire and continue a compassionate, generous, and welcoming Portland! If interested, please contact Som Subedi at 503-260-2487.

Living History Project  

In collaboration with The Immigrant Story project will be recording short "Living History" segments from 10 AM - 4:30 pm at the East Portland Neighborhood Office (1017 NE 117th, Portland, OR 97220) featuring stories of Immigrants and Refugees. Make sure to stop by and tell your story!


 [GA1]

Get Your #KPShades to Protect Your Eyes During the Eclipse

This summer’s Total Solar Eclipse falls on August 21, the day after Sunday Parkways, so Kaiser Permanente, our presenting sponsor, is giving away solar eclipse glasses at the Outer Northeast Portland ride to help you protect your eyes and thrive.

During the eclipse, some rays of the sun will peak around the moon in a halo, which you should try to avoid looking at directly. When you’re not seeing the full sun, it can feel much safer to look at it directly than it actually is. If you and your family are viewing the eclipse, it’ll be important to take special precautions to protect your vision.

“Staring directly at the sun or at a solar eclipse can harm your retinas, which contain the light-sensing cells that make vision possible,” said Anthony Cirino, MD, an ophthalmologist with Kaiser Permanente in Portland. “Usually, most of us can’t tolerate staring at the sun long enough to cause trouble. But a solar eclipse makes viewing the sun easier, less uncomfortable, and considerably more dangerous than usual.”

The only safe way to look directly at a partially eclipsed sun is through special solar filters, such as the eclipse glasses Kaiser Permanente is giving away at Sunday Parkways, along with a Vision Essentials flyer that has additional eye safety tips. You can pick up your glasses at the Kaiser Permanente booth at Thompson Park, or at any of our five sponsor booths on the route. (*While supplies last, one pair of glasses per family.)

Be sure to share your eclipse glasses photos on social media with hashtag #KPShades!

Guest Article