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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info

Vision Zero Progress

Vision Zero reports on progress to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries via annual reports that include crash data and performance measures

More information:

visionzero@portlandoregon.gov
503-823-4998


VISION ZERO TRAFFIC CRASH REPORT 2018 (pdf)

The latest data indicate that both deaths and serious injuries resulting from traffic crashes have decreased in Portland relative to prior year data (see Figure 1). As seen in Figure 2, this is the first decrease in overall deaths since 2014, and the first decrease in the number of people who have died while walking or a using mobility device since 2015.

Although these data are promising, one year does not make a trend and one death is too many. Eliminating all traffic deaths and serious injuries, while achievable, will require considerable continued effort by the City of Portland and residents.

LATEST DATA AT-A-GLANCE Deaths Serious injuries
  2018 2017 2016 2018 2017 2016
Transit 0 0 0 n/a 0 0
Biking 2 2 5 n/a 12 18
Motorcycling 9 7 6 n/a 37 43
Pedestrian 16 20 13 n/a 49 49
Driving 7 18 18 n/a 189 201
Total 34 47 42 n/a 287 311
Figure 1. Both traffic deaths and serious injuries have decreased relative to prior year data.

Data details: Serious injury data is not yet available for 2018 and is preliminary for 2017. Serious injuries are defined as “a non-fatal injury that prevents the injured person from walking, driving, or normally continuing the activities the person was capable of performing before the injury occurred” (ODOT).

Data: Portland Police Bureau (2018), Oregon Department of Transportation (2016-2017)
PORTLAND TRAFFIC DEATHS BY TRAVEL TYPE, 2014-2018

Figure 2.
With 34 fatal crashes, 2018 had fewer traffic deaths than in recent years.
Data: Portland Police Bureau (2018), Oregon Department of Transportation (2014-2017)

2018 crash data support Vision Zero focus

TRAFFIC DEATHS PER 100,000 PEOPLE IN THE U.S. AND PORTLAND, OREGON, 1990-2017

Figure 3.
Traffic deaths have remained steady nationwide since 2010.

Data: U.S. Census population estimates v2017, NHTSA FARS 2017

In 2018, the fewest number of traffic deaths occurred on streets in Portland since 2014, breaking the increasing trend that began locally and nationally after 2010 (see Figure 3). However, despite 13 fewer traffic deaths occurring in 2018 than in 2017, this does not indicate a trending decrease in traffic fatalities.

A previous analysis of 2004-2013 data found that 91% of deadly crashes in Portland involved speed, impairment, and other dangerous behaviors, and at least 57% involved street design. Vision Zero actions focus on these four factors to prevent deadly and serious injury crashes from occurring.

Preliminary 2017 data show that speed, impairment, and other dangerous behaviors continue to be factors in many traffic deaths that occur in Portland. In 2018, 59% of traffic deaths occurred on the High Crash Network (see map below), which indicates that continued investment in this network is important in preventing traffic deaths and serious injuries.

HIGH CRASH NETWORK STREETS & INTERSECTIONS, PORTLAND, OREGON

High Crash Network streets make up 8 percent of Portland’s street network. An interactive citywide map of Portland crashes is available at map.visionzeroportland.com.
Data: Oregon Department of Transportation

The High Crash Network comprises the 30 deadliest streets and intersections in Portland. Low-income communities and communities of color refers to locations with PBOT Equity Matrix Scores higher than 7, which are areas with relatively high proportions of individuals with these characteristics based on 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-year estimates.
People who died in traffic crashes, Portland, Oregon, 2018
34 people died in 2018 based on national reporting criteria (figure based on preliminary data; subject to change)

The first names and approximate location of Portland’s 34 traffic death victims. In addition to the people on the map, four people died in traffic crashes that are excluded under national reporting criteria. See “how crash data works” below for details.
Data: Portland Police Bureau

The table below describes the crash date, name, age, travel type and approximate crash location of people who died of traffic crashes in Portland in 2018.

In the year 2018:

  • October had the highest number of traffic deaths with six
  • The median age of people who died was 52, with a range from age 16 to 86
  • Of the people who died, 29 were male and nine were female
Date First name Last name Age Travel type Approximate crash location
1/21 Nathaniel  Teneyck 27 Motor vehicle I-84 near I-205
2/1 Yelena Loukas 53 Pedestrian SE Stark & 148th
2/6 Jeremy Sowa 43 Motorcycle SE Powell & 141st
2/7 Ted Jordan 78 Pedestrian SW Yamhill & 17th
2/11 Perwin Moni 34 Motor vehicle SE Stark &122nd
3/9 Wes Hatton 65 Pedestrian SE Belmont &30th
3/11 Fuk Chan 74 Pedestrian SE Division & 115th
3/21 Logan Dunlap 20 Pedestrian 12200 block NE Sandy
3/23 Dennis Ferrel 73 Pedestrian N Basin & N Emerson
4/9 James Freeman 16 Motor vehicle 14700 block SE Foster
4/19 Gregory Mitchell 58 Motorcycle NE Marine Dr & 6th Dr
4/19 Christopher Cannard 59 Motor vehicle I-84 at 82nd Ave
5/8 Dorothy Anderson 86 Pedestrian 16900 block SE Division
5/8 Jack Hibdon Jr. 52 Motorcycle I-205 at NE Glisan exit
5/13 Jason Shumacher 44 Motorcycle I-205 NB at I-84 WB exit
5/15 Daniel Feldt 50 Biking 2700 block NW Nicolai St
6/25 John Shulte 37 Motorcycle 300 block NE Tomahawk Island Dr
7/2 Gregory Harris 54 Motor vehicle NE Sandy & 158th
7/23 James Deery 69 Pedestrian SE Division & 158th
8/15 Hoa Nguyen-Phoc 44 Motorcycle Highway 30 & Bridge Ave
8/25 Nijuguna Githere 58 Pedestrian NE Sandy & 20th
8/28 Sandra Galloway 76 Motor vehicle NE Marine Dr & 122nd
10/2 Michael Dallasta 55 Motorcycle I-5 at Interstate Bridge
10/10 Thomas Sciborski 48 Motorcycle 8300 block NE Marine Dr
10/10 Loan Diep 54 Pedestrian SE Division & 138th
10/11 Charles McCarthy 82 Pedestrian E Burnside & 55th
10/15 Pamela Seidel 52 Biking SE Henderson & 82nd
10/26 Darnell Jolly 64 Pedestrian SE Stark & 146th
11/13 Cassidy McMillan 27 Pedestrian NE Airport Way & 138th
11/15 Jason Barns 32 Pedestrian 7400 block N Willamette Blvd
11/20 Ashlee Dale Pullman 20 Pedestrian 18200 block NE Marine Dr
12/18 Calvin Bitmier 21 Motor vehicle SB I-205 at SE Stark
12/19 Dayozjah Blassingame 19 Pedestrian EB I-84 at 148th
12/29 Jimmie Luff 48 Motorcycle NB I-205 at I-84
Deaths excluded by national reporting criteria
3/17 Briana Waulters   Pedestrian NE 42nd & Alberta Ct
4/20 Eric Griffen 42 Pedestrian NE I-5 at NE Broadway
8/5 Adrian Longmire 46 Motor vehicle SE Stark & 117th
11/14 Victoria Pettibone 66 Pedestrian NE Halsey & 162nd

How crash data works

CRASH DATA SOURCES

PBOT supplements the official crash record with Portland Police Bureau data to obtain the latest information.

ODOT compiles the official crash record for the State of Oregon using self-reported information and traffic crash investigations. For deadly crash data, PBOT also works directly with the Portland Police Bureau (see diagram).

PBOT uses national traffic crash reporting criteria that exclude people who die:

  • More than 30 days after a crash,
  • Intentionally (suicide),
  • In an act of homicide (a person intentionally crashes into another person),
  • In a crash not involving a motor vehicle,
  • From a prior medical event (e.g. a heart attack or drug overdose), or
  • In a crash in a parking lot.

PBOT excluded four deaths from crash reporting in 2018 as a result of these criteria (see bottom of table above). Deaths are also excluded if a medical examiner determines that a person died of causes not directly attributable to a traffic crash, such as suffering a heart attack while driving.

Regardless of reporting criteria, PBOT uses all available data to inform safety fixes.

Portland traffic deaths, 2009-2018

Pedestrian and motorcycle deaths on the rise

In 2018, 16 pedestrians and 9 motorcyclists died on Portland streets and highways. Although more pedestrians died in 2017 (20), pedestrian fatalities have trended up over the last five years. Similarly, motorcycle fatalities have been steadily trending up over the same period.

Seventy percent of pedestrian crashes citywide occur at intersections, both signalized and unsignalized. Forty-three percent occur specifically at signalized intersections. Darker lighting conditions result in lower visibility and are a contributing factor in the severity of pedestrian crashes. While thirty-nine percent of all pedestrian crashes occur in low-light conditions, sixty-one percent of fatal and severe pedestrian crashes occur in the same conditions.

Of the nine fatal motorcycle crashes in 2018, five of them occurred on the state highway or interstate system. In the period from 2013-2018, 46% of the 35 fatal motorcycle crashes involved a motorcyclist speeding or driving too fast for conditions and 37% were single vehicle crashes that did not involve any other road users.


VISION ZERO PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2018 (pdf)

Number of people killed and seriously injured in traffic crashes in the City of Portland, disaggregated by mode, age, and geography, compared to prior years

 

Deaths

Serious injuries

2018 2013-17 average 2017 2012-16 average
  Total 34 36 285 238

Travel type

Pedestrian 16 13 48 34
Biking 2 2 12 22
Auto/motorcycle 16 22 225 182
Transit 0 0 0 0

Age

<18 1 1 20 16
18-24 4 4 46 39
25-44 8 14 110 96
45-64 13 13 75 67
65+ 8 4 35 22

Location

Central 1 3 39 34
Inner 5 13 107 94
Western 1 3 24 19
Eastern 18 12 69 64
Industrial & River 8 5 38 22
Bridges 1 0 8 5
Data: Portland Police Bureau (2018), Oregon Department of Transportation (2012-17).
Note: Complete crash data is available only through 2016. 2017 data is preliminary and limited to serious injuries and deaths. Pattern areas are defined in Portland’s Comprehensive Plan (see map).
PATTERN AREAS IN PORTLAND


Pattern areas are defined by natural and built features.

Action timing & description

 Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Overall
10-year

Eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries

Progress: 25%

Number of people killed and seriously injured in traffic crashes in the City of Portland, disaggregated by mode, age, and geography, compared to prior years See table above  
Whether funding is secured from new local, regional, or state sources for implementation of Vision Zero actions No new funding secured in 2018 Vision Zero continues to rely primarily on a combination of state and local funds
Amount of Vision Zero infrastructure investment citywide and in low-income communities and communities of color Citywide: $31.9m

Low-income communities and communities of color: $29.7m
In 2017, PBOT invested $15.4m, of which $7.6m was in low-income communities and communities of color.

Street Design

Action timing & description

Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Street Design Action 1
2-year

Build capital safety improvements on two segments and five intersections in the High Crash Network each year, prioritizing improvements in and engaging with low-income communities and communities of color

Progress: 25%

Number of segments and intersections in the High Crash Network receiving capital safety improvements compared to prior years 2 segments

6+ intersections
Segments: Foster Road Streetscape, Halsey-Weidler Streetscape

Intersections: MLK & Alberta, West Burnside & 18th/19th, Holgate & 41st/42nd, Beaverton-Hillsdale & 35th, Powell & 31st, Powell & 34th (see SD6 for additional locations)

In 2017, PBOT built capital safety improvements on 0 HCN segments and at 3 intersections.
Annual average number of deadly and serious crashes on improved segments by mode compared to prior 5-year annual averages in the same segments N/A (data not yet available) PBOT will report pre- and post-project data as segments are completed.
SD2
2-year

Secure a stable state-level transportation funding source dedicated to safety

Progress: 100%
Creation of a stable, state-level funding source dedicated to safety No new state-level funding sources in 2018 Passage of House Bill 2017 in 2017 is providing long-term funding for investments that include safety fixes on Portland streets.
SD3
2-year

Deploy a multi-agency fatal rapid response team to fatal crash locations to evaluate the site for safety enhancements

Progress: 100%

Percentage of deadly crash locations jointly reviewed by PBOT and PPB 100% jointly reviewed Reviews may include field visits
SD4
2-year

Develop guidelines for installation criteria for marked pedestrian and bicycle crossings, including crossing enhancements, based on vehicle speeds and volumes, street characteristics, transit stops, and other factors

Progress: 75%

Percentage of marked pedestrian and bicycle crossings that meet guidelines 96% meet guidelines Data current through early 2018.
SD5
2-year

Develop guidelines for installation criteria for protected bike lanes based on vehicle speeds, volumes, and other factors

Progress: 75%

Number of protected bike lane miles installed using the guidelines 0.8 miles of new protected bike lanes built in 2018

6.0 miles of protected bike lanes exist citywide
In 2017, PBOT built 1.7 miles of protected bike lanes
SD6
5-year

Review and provide recommendations for existing marked pedestrian crossings on the High Crash Network, including lighting, crossing enhancements, and spacing frequency. Prioritize improvements and new marked crossings

Progress: 25%

Number of existing marked pedestrian crossings improved annually in the High Crash Network 30 existing marked pedestrian crossings improved Crossing enhancements occurred at 82nd & Davis, Foster, Woodstock, Flavel; 122nd & Shaver; Beaverton-Hillsdale & 30th, Shattuck; Broadway & 14th; East Burnside & 148th; West Burnside & 18th/19th; Capitol & Huber; Division & 76th; Foster & 58th, Cora, Holgate, 65th, 69th, 72nd; Fremont & 33rd; Glisan & I-205; Halsey & 74th ; MLK & Alberta; Powell & 21st, 24th, 26th, 31st, 33rd, 34th; Stark & I-205, 148th

Note: Some locations have construction continuing into 2019.
Number of new marked pedestrian crossings built annually in the High Crash Network 13 new marked pedestrian crossings  New crossings installed at 92nd & Market; Beaverton-Hillsdale & 35th; Foster & 74th, 84th; Fremont & 127th; Halsey & 106th, 112th; Holgate & 41st/42nd; Lombard & New York, Baltimore, Alta, Leavitt, Charleston
Percentage of the High Crash Network system that meets marked crossing frequency guidelines In 2018, 17% of the High Crash Network met guidelines. Data reflects TSP classifications updated as part of the PedPDX Pedestrian Master Plan Update in 2018.
SD7
5-year

Improve safe pedestrian and bicycle access to transit stops along key bus routes, prioritizing the High Crash Network in low-income communities and communities of color, and where appropriate, in conjunction with increases in bus service frequency

Progress: 25%
Number of improved transit stops along bus routes
1) in the High Crash Network, and
2) within low-income communities and communities of color annually
1. 24 improved transit stops in the High Crash Network

2. 12 improved transit stops in the High Crash Network within low-income communities and communities of color
1.
  • 82nd & Davis, Foster, Woodstock, Flavel
  • NE 122nd & Shaver
  • SW Beaverton-Hillsdale & 30th, 35th, Shattuck
  • West Burnside & 18th/19th
  • SE Division & 76th
  • SE Foster & Cora, Holgate, 65th, 69th, 74th
  • NE Fremont & 33rd
  • NE Halsey & 74th
  • SE Powell & 21st, 24th, 26th, 34th
  • SE Holgate & 41st/42nd
  • N Lombard & New York, Baltimore

2.
  • 82nd & Davis, Foster, Woodstock, Flavel
  • NE 122nd & Shaver
  • West Burnside & 18th/19th
  • SE Foster & Holgate, 65th, 69th, 74th
  • SE Powell & 26th, 34th
SD8
5-year

Prioritize safety criteria in federal, state, regional, and local funding decision-making processes

Progress: 75%
Number of places where new safety criteria are included in federal, state, regional, and local funding decision-making processes New regional safety criteria included in the 2018 update to the Metro Regional Transportation Plan adopted in December 2018 For the first time, Metro adopted the goal to eliminate all deaths and life-changing injuries from collisions by 2035. In support of this goal, the 2018 RTP update includes "prioritize projects that focus on safety in high crash corridors" as one of seven metrics used to allocate project funding.

Impairment

Action (w/timing) and description

Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Impairment Action 1
2-year
 
Work with driver-for-hire services (including taxi cabs, transportation network companies and other private companies), transit providers and bar owners to develop a targeted DUII program in Portland’s entertainment district and other hotspots linked to DUII citations

Progress: 75%

 
Development of a targeted DUII program Yes, continued to coordinate Safe Ride Home with partners  Safe Ride Home is a partnership to prevent impaired driving that offers free and discounted rides and promotes transit service. Safe Ride Home was held in 2019 on St. Patrick's Day, Cinco de Mayo, Oregon Brewers Festival, Halloween, and New Year's Eve.
Number of safe ride vouchers used in targeted DUII program area compared to prior years 3,075 vouchers in 2018, compared to 3,389 vouchers in 2017 Includes the following 2018 holidays/events: St. Patrick's Day, Cinco de Mayo, Oregon Brewers Festival, Halloween, and New Years Eve on 12/31/2018.
I2
2-year

Allow pre-payment for morning parking in specified districts (in combination with Action I.1) to encourage impaired drivers to leave their cars overnight without concern of getting a parking ticket or being towed

Progress: 75%

Number of parking districts with policies that allow for overnight parking through mid-morning 0 parking districts. Any new meter districts will have 10 a.m. start time. City Council adopted the Performance Based Parking Management Manual, which directs new meter districts to begin enforcement at 10 a.m. This mid-morning start time facilitates overnight parking for individuals who may too impaired to drive safely.
I3
2-year

Secure funding to increase the number of police officers trained as Drug Recognition Experts

Progress: 25%

Increased number of police officers trained as DREs No, number of DRE officers not increased Total number of PPB officers trained as drug recognition experts is 12, compared to 13 officers in 2017.
I4
5-year

Utilize marijuana or alcohol tax revenue to increase funding for DUII drug and mental health preventions and for treatment services

Progress: 75%

Legislation passed to increase funding Cannabis: Legislation passed in 2016 increasing funding for drug and alcohol treatment, public safety investments, and support for neighborhood small businesses.

Alcohol: No new legislation
Cannabis: 20% of statewide tax revenue for alcohol, drug, and mental health services. A portion of the 3% Portland tax is dedicated to Vision Zero.

Alcohol: 4% of statewide tax revenue for alcohol, drug, and mental health services
I5
5-year

Increase access and expand referrals to the DUII Intensive Supervision Program (DISP)

Progress: 0%
 
Number of participants in DISP program after legislation compared to before No legislation passed  DISP participant details:
  • 181 DISP participants in 2018 (224 in 2017)
  • 53 successfully completed (54)
  • 107 are actively reporting and on probation (140)
  • 13 were revoked (17)
  • 7 went on warrant status (11)
  • 1 transferred out of the program (2)

Speed

Action (w/timing) and description

Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Speed Action 1
2-year

Pilot speed safety cameras on four high crash corridors in the first two years; expand program to additional high crash corridors following the pilot

Progress: 75%
Number of speeding-related citations issued by speed safety cameras compared to baseline 41,463 citations issued in 2018, compared to 43,015 citations in 2017 
  • SE 122nd: 3,361
  • SW Beaverton-Hillsdale: 9,273
  • SE Division: 23,047
  • NE Marine: 5,782

Marine Drive cameras began issuing citations on 3/22/2018, all other cameras active for full year.
Percentage decrease of autos traveling over posted speed after speed safety cameras were installed 57% decrease, on average 
  • SE 122nd: 68% decrease
  • SW Beaverton-Hillsdale: 61% decrease
  • SE Division: 47% decrease
  • NE Marine: 50% decrease
S2
2-year

Gain local authority for speed reduction on City of Portland streets; prioritize setting safe speed limits in the High Crash Network

Progress: 50%
Obtainment of local authority for speed reduction  Obtained partial authority in 2017 Speed limits remain under control of the state.

Passage of HB 2682 in 2017 allowed Portland to reduce speeds on residential streets to 20 miles per hour in 2018.
Number of street segments where posted speeds have been reduced In addition to reducing the speed limit on all residential streets, PBOT reduced the speed limit on 34 segments of 30 streets. View the complete list of streets at visionzeroportland.com.
S3
2-year

Improve street design to support safe speeds in conjunction with posted speed reduction on four to six streets (not including SD.1 improvements) annually in the High Crash Network, prioritizing improvements in and engaging with low-income communities and communities of color

Progress: 100%
Number of high crash corridors receiving speed improvements each year 3 streets received speed improvements
  • Lombard Street (multiple marked crossings from New York to Charleston, updated speed limit from Buchanan to Russet)
  • Marine Drive (speed safety cameras at 33rd & 138th, updated speed limit from Marine Way to 33rd)
  • Powell Boulevard (lighting, high visibility striping, multiple enhanced crossings from 20th to 34th)
Percentage decrease of autos traveling over posted speed after improvements 50% average decrease  Percent of people driving over speed limit post-improvement compared to pre-improvement:
  • Lombard Street: data not yet available
  • Marine Drive: 42% eastbound and 31% westbound compared to 84% eastbound and 76% westbound
  • Powell Boulevard: data not yet available

Dangerous Behaviors

Action (w/timing) and description

Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Dangerous Behaviors Action 1
2-year

Focus traffic enforcement on the High Crash Network and on behaviors contributing to fatal and serious injury crashes (including speed, impairment, and dangerous behaviors); de-emiles per hourasize less serious infractions

Progress: 75%
 
Percentage of citations focusing on identified dangerous behaviors, within Portland at large and in the High Crash Network 65% of citations issued in 2018 by the Traffic Division related to a dangerous behavior, of which 52% were on a High Crash Network street  "Dangerous behaviors" include the following violations: careless/reckless driving, distracted, DUII/Substance related, passing, safety belt, speed, traffic control devices, turning, and vulnerable road user.

The data refers only to Traffic Division officers.

Data: Portland Police Bureau
D2
2-year

Use data-driven process to reorganize and expand red light safety camera program

Progress: 25%
Number of new red light safety cameras on Portland streets compared to baseline 0 new cameras Will expand after existing contract expires on April 1, 2019
Annual average number of deadly and serious crashes at red light camera intersections after installation, compared to 5-year annual averages prior to installation 0 deaths at all camera locations before and after camera installation

2.7 injuries annually on average post-camera installation compared to 4.64 injuries annually on average pre-camera installation (all injury severities are included to ensure sufficient data) 
Data includes all injury crashes involving ignoring a traffic signal (DIS-RAG, DIS-TCD and DIS-SIG).
Annual average data at all camera locations with installation date (post-camera injuries|pre-camera injuries):
  • SW 4th & Jefferson, 2007: 1.2|3.6
  • NE Broadway & Grand, 2003: 2.1|2.4
  • W Burnside & 19th, 2002: 0.2|1.8
  • SE Foster & 96th, 2009: 7.1|9.2
  • NE Grand & Burnside, 2001: 2.1|7.4
  • SE Grand & Madison, 2002: 2.0|2.6
  • NE Sandy & Chávez, 2001: 1.0|2.2
  • SE Stark & 99th, 2008: 3.3|3.6
  • SE Stark & 102nd, 2008: 2.7|6.8
  • SE Washington & 103rd, 2008: 5.6|6.8

Data: Oregon Department of Transportation (1996-2016)
D3
2-year

Include Vision Zero content in driver trainings for public agencies and contractors, and for private companies

Progress: 25%
Number of public and private agencies incorporating Vision Zero content in employee driver trainings 1 City of Portland agency, plus City of Portland as a whole In 2017 the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services developed a Vision Zero training that all contractors are expected to complete. In 2018, the City of Portland added Vision Zero content to classroom-based Defensive Driver training that is required for certain City employees.
D4
2-year

Increase access and expand referrals to traffic schools and other forms of traffic safety education for all road users

Progress: 25%
Percentage of moving violations that offer driver diversion 2,429 people attended a traffic safety class in lieu of receiving a fixed speed safety camera citation Data is from July 2018 through November 2018. Diversion for fixed speed safety camera violations was not available prior to July 2018. Data is not yet available for December 2018.
D5
5-year

Revise current Oregon distracted driving law to remove loopholes and be consistent with federal guidance

Progress: 100%
Oregon law revised to remove loopholes and be consistent with federal guidance Yes, revised law took effect Oct. 1, 2017  Revised law facilitates enforcement and expands diversion options
D6
5-year

Support legislation to increase funding for and access to driver education, frequency of testing, and inclusion of urban transportation safety in test materials

Progress: 0%
Increasing access to driver education and/or frequency of driver testing was placed on the City’s legislative agenda No, not specifically placed on 2019 agenda The City of Portland's 2019 State Legislative Agenda includes an objective to "support legislation that advances Vision Zero and helps reduce traffic fatalities and serious injuries."

Legislation passed to increase access to driver education

Yes, legislation passed in 2017  Revised distracted driving law (HB 2597) allows for suspension of fine for first offense if course completed
Legislation passed to increase the frequency of driver testing No, legislation not passed in 2018 The City of Portland's 2019 State Legislative Agenda includes an objective to "support legislation that advances Vision Zero and helps reduce traffic fatalities and serious injuries."
Number of students who completed driver education through the increased funding and access 0 students Funding and access not yet increased
D7
5-year

Develop and implement safety measures on heavy trucks owned or contracted by the City, including but not limited to truck sideguards, sensors, additional mirrors, educational messaging and enhanced driver safety training.

Phase I: Education outreach for all and City fleet upgrades;
Phase II: City contractors and service providers install truck upgrades

Progress: 25%
Percentage of city fleet trucks with safety measures implemented 0% trucks (funding has been secured for implementation in 2019-20) Many fleet trucks have been outfitted with materials having effects similar to truck sideguards, but they have not been assessed for compliance with national safety standards. PBOT has secured funding for nationally compliant city fleet truck safety measures, and expects to retrofit trucks starting in 2019.
Percentage of contractor and service provider fleet trucks with safety measures implemented A City of Portland pilot project has installed sideguards on 18 contractor and service provider trucks. The Bureau of Planning & Sustainability is leading the pilot project under leadership from the Planning & Sustainability Commission.  
Number of injuries, serious injuries or deaths, by mode, that involve heavy trucks 1,066 people were injured in 2012-16 and 22 people died in crashes in 2014-18 involving heavy trucks, compared to 1,189 injuries in 2011-15 and 36 deaths in 2013-17
Data reflects latest available information. “Heavy trucks” includes buses.
  • # people injured, 2012-16: 17 walking, 16 biking, 0 using transit, 1,033 in motor vehicles
  • # people seriously injured, 2012-16: 0 walking, 5 biking, 0 using transit, 36 in motor vehicles
  • # people killed, 2014-18: 3 walking, 5 biking, 0 using transit, 14 in motor vehicles

Data: Portland Police Bureau (2018), Oregon Department of Transportation (2012-17)

Engagement & Accountability

Action (w/timing) and description

Performance measure

2018 data

Data details

Engagement & Accountability Action 1
2-year

Conduct multi-component education campaigns to build public awareness and leverage Vision Zero actions

Progress: 50%

Number of multi-component campaigns conducted compared to prior years 13 trainings, 9 tabling events, 2 crosswalk education & enforcement actions, 12 '20 is plenty' distribution events. Created and distributed Struck messaging focused on the impact of speed, the first citywide Vision Zero campaign. Trainings and tabling events provide people with skills and tools to navigate Portland streets safely. Trainings are tailored to the needs of community groups.

PBOT will launch a refreshed Struck campaign in 2019.
EA2
2-year

Form agency-led “street teams” that engage people driving, walking, biking and taking transit to raise awareness of Vision Zero and moving safely through Portland

Progress: 50%
Number of street team events held in low-income communities and communities of color 8 street team events Events held on SE 122nd Avenue, NE Broadway Street, SE Chávez Boulevard, SE Division Street, NE Multnomah Street, SE Powell Boulevard, and SE Stark Street within low-income communities and communities of color
Number of street team events held citywide 11 street team events PBOT and partners held 11 street team events in 2018 near SE Division Street & 82nd Avenue, SE 122nd Avenue & Stark Street, Midland Library on SE 122nd Avenue, SE Chávez Boulevard & Hawthorne Boulevard, SE Stark Street & 160th Avenue, SE Powell Boulevard & Chávez Boulevard, NE Multnomah Street & 6th Avenue, NE Oregon Street & 8th Avenue, NE Multnomah Street & 9th Avenue, NE Broadway Street & 14th Avenue, SE 82nd Avenue & Division Street.
EA3
2-year

Develop targeted engagement for middle and high school students in traffic safety through the Safe Routes to School program, with a focus on empowering youth leadership to promote safe transportation in their own school communities, prioritizing low-income communities and communities of color

Progress: 25%
Number of students involved in traffic safety programs, in Portland at large and in low-income communities and communities of color 0 middle school students

0 high school students
Program development underway.
EA4
2-year

Regularly cross-check trauma data from the Oregon Health Authority against Oregon Department of Transportation crash data to identify demographic patterns (age, race/ethnicity), geographic patterns, and misreporting or under-reporting of serious injury crashes

Progress: 25%
Frequency of cross-checks between trauma (OHA) and ODOT crash data 0 cross-checks Hired Vision Zero Data Analyst in 2018 to enhance staff capacity. Working on this action with Multnomah County Health Department and Oregon Health Authority
Percentage of unmatched records in both OHA and ODOT data sets for serious injury crashes Unknown Working on this action with Multnomah County Health Department and Oregon Health Authority
EA5
2-year

Improve timeliness of deadly and serious crash data processing and reporting

Progress: 50%
Period of time between end of year and when deadly and serious injury crash data have been processed and reported

2017 data: 8 to 11 months

2016 data: 5 months

Received preliminary 2017 summary data from ODOT in September 2018 and preliminary record-level data including deaths and serious injuries in December 2018.

Received preliminary 2016 summary data including deaths and serioues injuries in June 2017.
EA6
2-year

Include review of traffic crash data, equity data, and traffic safety performance at monthly Portland Bureau of Transportation and Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division meetings

Progress: 100% 
Occurrence of monthly meetings Yes, held monthly meetings Continuing in 2019
EA7
5-year

Create a community grant program to support a variety of safety-related efforts, including but not limited to street design visioning, outreach and education, and collaborative safety improvements in low-income communities and communities of color within the High Crash Network

Progress: 0%   
Number of community grants awarded in low-income communities and communities of color 0 grants Funding not yet identified
Number of grants awarded citywide 0 grants Funding not yet identified
EA8
5-year

Secure increased funding and personnel to staff timely investigation of deadly crashes

Progress: 0%
Increased funding and personnel for investigation of fatal crashes No, funding not increased Funding not yet identified
EA9
5-year

Improve data collection on speed, impairment, and distraction at serious and deadly crashes

Progress: 100%
Percentage of serious and fatal crashes for which impairment was examined/ investigated 100% of deadly and serious injury crashes investigated by the Major Crash Team that meet national reporting criteria During every Major Crash Team callout, investigators look for the key contributors to the crash which include, but are not limited to, impairment by drugs or alcohol, speeding and distracted driving due to an electronic device. Depending on their initial observations, the examination of these factors may be very cursory such as asking a few questions of the driver/witnesses or scrolling through a phone, or they may be very in depth where a search warrant is obtained to gain a blood draw from the driver, downloading the contents of the data recorder in the vehicle or downloading the contents of a smart phone.

If evidence of speeding, impairment or distracted driving was obtained, the evidence will be collected and documented.

Data: Portland Police Bureau
Percentage of serious and fatal crashes for which speeding was examined/investigated
Percentage of serious and fatal crashes for which distracted driving was examined/investigated

Vision Zero Performance Measures 2017

Vision Zero Performance Measures 2017

Vision Zero Performance Measures 2018

Vision Zero Performance Measures 2018

Vision Zero Traffic Crash Report 2018

Vision Zero Traffic Crash Report 2018