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Dylan Rivera

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503-823-3723

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News Blog: Meet the 2017-2018 PBOT Bureau and Budget Advisory Committee (BBAC)

 Saltzman at BBAC

Transportation Commissioner Dan Saltzman and Director Leah Treat meet with the PBOT Bureau and Budget Advisory Committee in January 2017. Photo: Portland Bureau of Transportation

(Sept. 19, 2017) We are thrilled to unveil the PBOT Bureau of Transportation’s Bureau and Budget Advisory Committee (BBAC) for fiscal year 2017-2018. BBAC members will inform the bureau’s annual transportation budget; review program priorities and infrastructure project lists; and provide input on the strategy and direction for incorporating equity into PBOT’s work and engaging communities that PBOT has traditionally underserved.

All City of Portland bureaus are required to have Budget Advisory Committees. These committees provide residents the opportunity to provide important input into the budget priorities of the individual bureaus. In 2015, Director Leah Treat expanded PBOT’s own Budget Advisory Committee into the Bureau and Budget Advisory Committee in an effort to offer a more robust avenue for public input year around.

“PBOT is committed to hearing from a diverse cross section of Portlanders so that we better understand the people we serve and their transportation needs. Our public advisory groups are key venues for us to seek public input and reimagine the future of Portland’s transportation system," said Director Treat. "Our policies and programs have become stronger because of the BBAC’s engagement and we plan to continue on that path this year. The 2017-2018 committee members represent both the veterans of the transportation world and the next generation of transportation leaders. The diverse mix of experience, backgrounds, areas of expertise, geographic and community affiliations will be a great resource for our upcoming budget and policy discussions.”

The 2017-2018 BBAC will include 5 new members and 13 returning members. BBAC members are appointed by PBOT Director Leah Treat for a one year term and may sit on the committee up to five years. The group includes representatives from PBOT’s modal committees (Bicycle Advisory Committee, Pedestrian Advisory Committee and Portland Freight Committee) and representatives from PBOT employee unions. The new members were selected via a competitive application process over the summer. 2017-2018 BBAC member bios are available below. For more information about the BBAC and to follow committee business throughout the year, please visit the committee website.

September Meeting Notice

The first meeting of the Bureau and Budget Advisory Committee is scheduled for Thursday, September 21, 2017 from 4:00 – 6:00pm at the Portland Building (8th floor, Hawthorne Conference room). The meeting is open to the public. The committee meets monthly on the third Thursday of each month from September 2017 to June 2018. Meeting materials will be posted online after each meeting. 

New BBAC Members

Patricia Montgomery

Patricia M

Patricia Montgomery has worked in the transportation industry for over 30 years. She has taken on various roles within that industry that includes previous ownership of a medical transportation company, COO of New Rose City Cab Company and Bantu Enterprises, and over 20 experience as a taxi driver in the field.  Her vast experience includes Private for Hire Transportation Board Voting Member, and numerous transportation committees.  She currently is Co-Chair of the Elliott Neighborhood Association, and Junior Warden of St. Philip the Deacon Episcopal Church.  With the changing transportation industry Patricia has joined this committee to provide direct insight and knowledge from her experience. 

Kevin Vandermore

kevin v

Kevin Vandemore is an experienced Certified Public Accountant who specializes in enhancing organizational value by providing risk based and objective assurance, advice and insight. His career includes work in public accounting and private industry, and he has experience working with a diverse set of companies from smaller entities to large public corporations. He earned a Masters of Science in Financial Analysis from Portland State University where he took the university’s motto to heart – let knowledge serve the city. In addition to volunteering and being active in the community he enjoys mountaineering, traveling and riding his bike.

Maria Hernandez

Maria H

Maria Hernandez Segoviano was born and raised in La Cruz de Aguilar, Guanajuato, México. She moved to Woodburn, Oregon at the age of 12, with her family, and has since considered Woodburn home. After acquiring a bachelor’s of science degree from Willamette University in Political Science and minoring in Sociology and Latin American Studies, Maria went on to do a Public Affairs Fellowship with CORO Northern California. Most recently, Maria was the Deputy Campaign Manager working to elect State Representative Teresa Alonso Leon, the first Indigenous Latina to represent a district in the state of Oregon. Presently, Maria is the Advocacy Coordinator for OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon. Maria leads OPAL’s statewide community-connecting, providing our partners access to solidarity networks and opportunities to build local power. She also serves on the Oregon Latino Agenda for Action Board.

Frannie K

Frannie Knight

Frannie Knight is a senior at Valor Christian School International located in Beaverton, Oregon. She wants to pursue a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Science and Political Science and then either go to law school or get a graduate degree in Environmental Engineering. In high school, Frannie participates in numerous science competitions and Mock Trials. She enjoys reading, going to school, and being with friends and family. 

Molly Baer Kramer

Molly K

Molly has worked in nonprofit fundraising and administration in Portland since 2001, primarily for conservation organizations. Most recently she served as Deputy Director for the Oregon League of Conservation Voters. She is currently a consultant and holds a DPhil in history from the University of Oxford.

Molly’s key focus as a member of PBOT’s BBAC will be to represent the interests of disabled communities. She is able-bodied but her long-term partner is paralyzed and uses a wheelchair. She will utilize her connections with disability-rights organizations, including the Portland Commission on Disability, to ensure that the needs of the disabled are understood and integrated into PBOT’s planning and budgeting.

Returning BBAC Members

Arlene Kimura

Arlene K

East Portland supporter/activist since 1992. Arlene initially became involved through the neighborhood system with land use planning, transportation issues, including urban trails, and environmental concerns. As East Portland has changed, Kimura has also become interested in health and economic development opportunities.

Elaine O'Keefe

Pedestrian Advisory Committee Representative

Elaine O

Elaine O’Keefe worked in local government for more than two decades. Including over a decade with Portland Fire and Rescue. Currently, she is a board member of the Sellwood-Moreland Improvement League (SMILE), a member of the SMILE Transportation Committee, and a member of the Portland Pedestrian Advisory Committee.

Heather Bowman

Heather B

Heather Bowman is a partner with the law firm Bodyfelt Mount where her litigation practice includes employment discrimination and professional liability defense. Bowman’s practice includes engagement in civil rights issues and other volunteer work includes examining equity issues in legal practice. She uses all forms of transportation, and particularly appreciates transportation cycling.

Heather McCarey

Heather M

Bicycle Advisory Committee Representative

Heather McCarey has a master's degree in City and Regional Planning from Georgia Tech and works with Transportation Management Associations in urban, suburban, and park settings. McCarey is currently the Executive Director of Explore Washington Park, one of the first Transportation Management Associations in the nation created to address transportation issues both to and throughout a city park.

 Kaliska Day

Kaliska D

Kaliska Day, is a native Oregonian and an Alaska Native of the Tligint/Haida Tribe. With a degree in Construction Management from Arizona State University, Day has multi-year experience in the construction management sector, including serving as a construction management consultant for various public works agencies in California and Oregon.

 Meesa Long

Meesa L

A resident of Southeast Portland, Meesa Long is a Reading Specialist in an East County Middle School and is also passionate about serving her community and neighborhood. In her work with transportation issues in Portland, Long’s main goal has been to increase safe pedestrian travel for children and families within under-served neighborhoods, and to think outside the box to create positive and equitable transportation improvements within the city.

 Momoko Saunders

BBAC Co-Chair

Momoko S

Momoko Saunders is a software engineer and resident of East Portland. She is on the board of the non-profit Bike Farm, which she co-founded in 2007. Momoko is also an active volunteer for App Camp 4 Girls and board member of Portland Society.

 Pia Welch

Freight Advisory Committee Representative

Pia W

Pia Welch began her career with Flying Tigers in California which was later acquired by FedEx Express. She has since worked for FedEx for close to three decades. Welch has served as President of Portland Air Cargo Association, Board Member American Association of University Women, and member and Vice Chair of the Portland Freight Committee. She is currently the Chair of the Freight Committee. She has been involved in city projects including; The Comprehensive Plan, Airport Way Project and various sub-committee groups when topics required more in-depth study.  

 Ruthanne Bennett

Ruthanne B

PTE Local 17 Representative

An civil engineer with PBOT, Ruthanne Bennett represents PTE Local 17/COPPEA Chapter. She has been a union member for 20 years and a COPPEA Steward for five years.  She has consistently advocated for transportation priorities, including supporting the Fix Our Streets package and the COPPEA Value Capture program. She was instrumental in creating the COPPEA Value Capture program, which is an innovative program to encourage and fund the construction of safe street infrastructure during development projects. In addition to her B.S. in Civil Engineering she has a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics from Portland State University.

 Ryan Hashagen

Ryan H

Ryan Hashagen is a volunteer with Better Block PDX. A Professional Tricyclist, he has founded and run several tricycle based businesses in Canada & the U.S. Hashagen won the Cargo Messenger World Championship in 2003 & 2004 in Seattle & Edmonton. He enjoys working to connect, collaborate, and facilitate tactical urbanism projects with a wide range of organizations, businesses, and agencies.

Samuel Gollah

Samuel G

Sam Gollah has over a decade of experience in entitlement processing, including land use and permit compliance as a public and private planner throughout the Willamette Valley. Gollah has also provided zoning and equity consulting services for the City of Portland’s Comprehensive Plan update (2035).  He currently serves as a member of the City of Portland’s Transportation Expert Group (TEG).

Thomas Karwaki

Thomas

Thomas Karwaki chairs the University Park Neighborhood Association, an organization with over 9,000 members and that includes the University of Portland. Karwaki coordinates land use, public safety, emergency response, communication and public relations efforts of the UPNA.

Tony Lamb

Tony L

BBAC Co-Chair

Tony is a graduate of Portland State University’s Community Development program with a focus on community empowerment, economic development and the creation of a livable community for all without displacement. He is currently pursuing a graduate degree at the Portland State University Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) program.

Tony has served on numerous social justice and economic development initiatives including the following: Social Justice and Civic Leadership Cohort with the Urban League of Portland, East Portland Action Plan Economic Development Subcommittee, PBOT Transportation Expert Group, Multnomah County Digital Inclusion member, Steering Committee for McLennan County Reintegration Round Table, City of Waco Poverty Reduction Committee and Open-Table Anti-Poverty Program International Tech Committee.

 

PBOT News Release: SW Main Street, a key entrance to downtown, gets a face-lift thanks to Fixing Our Streets Program

First and Main Before Screen Shot Bike

As this video shows, pavement in very poor condition makes it challenging to ride a bike on SW Main Street, where one of the busiest bike routes in North America enters downtown Portland. (Video by Belen Herrera, Portland Bureau of Transportation.)

(SW Main St by bike: See VIDEO from PBOT's YouTube Channel)

(Sept. 15, 2017) Southwest Main Street, a key entrance into downtown Portland for people biking, walking and driving, will get a much-needed face-lift, with construction starting Monday Sept. 18 for a complete rebuild of the pavement and realignment of the bike lane, thanks to the voter-approved Fixing Our Streets Program.

The street improvements will require nighttime road closures and daytime lane closures from Sept. 18 through Oct. 27 on SW Main St, between SW 

First Ave and SW Second Ave. Nighttime closures begin on Monday night, Sept. 18. Daytime lane closures begin Thursday, Sept. 21.

Fixing Our Streets Logo

Two travel lanes will remain open during daytime hours from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays, but with intermittent closures that only allow one lane open from time to time. This section of SW Main Street normally has two travel lanes, a right-turn lane and a bike lane.

The project will greatly improve a section of failing roadway that serves as a main entrance to downtown Portland from the Hawthorne Bridge. The pavement is cracked, buckling and sagging. People riding bicycles westbound on the bridge, one of the busiest bike routes in North America, find it difficult to navigate the road surface. The road striping has bus and bicycle traffic weaving in the middle of the intersection.

The project will replace the base underneath the road surface and provide new asphalt that will extend the life of the pavement by 15 to 20 years. A concrete bus pad at the transit stop will further ensure the resiliency of the street improvements.

A new bikeway design will provide a bike box to increase visibility of people on bicycles at SW Main and First Ave. It will provide new green striping to highlight areas that are bike only, as well as areas where bike traffic and vehicle traffic intersect. Green boxes will also mark places at intersections where people riding bikes are recommended to change direction.

Get Portland Moving Circle Logo

The Multnomah County Courthouse, Multnomah County Morrison Bridge Closure, and PBOT’s Fixing Our Streets Program have been coordinating through the Get Portland Moving effort to limit the effects of construction projects in the right-of-way on the general public. The pedestrian island at SW First Ave and SW Main St has to be reconstructed to repave SW Main St. A Morrison Bridge full bridge closure has been rescheduled until the Main Street project has completed the majority of its work in the right-of-way.

Bike on SW First and Main Street Before Fixing Our Streets

Pavement in very poor condition has made it challenging for people to ride bicycles on SW Main Street. A project funded by the Fixing Our Streets Program will rebuild the street and provide improved bike lanes and bike boxes for safer travel. (Photo by Sarah Petersen, Portland Bureau of Transportation.)

 

Road and lane closures during construction: SW Main between SW First Ave and SW Second Ave

This work is weather-dependent, and the schedule may change

Weekday nighttime full closures start Monday, Sept 18: All travel lanes and the bike lane will be closed. The work hours will vary, generally between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. Sidewalks will remain open.

Weekend full closures, Sept. 30-Oct. 1, and Oct. 14-15: All travel lanes on SW Main St will be closed from 7 p.m. on Fridays to 6 a.m. on Mondays. Sidewalks will remain open.

Weekday daytime lane closures start Thursday, Sept 21: Two travel lanes will remain open during morning and evening rush hour. Intermittent closures that only allow one lane open from time to time will occur between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays.

Bike detour information: People riding bikes westbound on SW Main St may ride in the travel lane. They may also be more comfortable using signed detour routes that direct people riding bicycles to exit the Hawthorne Bridge ramp into Gov. Tom McCall Waterfront Park. From the park, people on bicycles may cross SW Naito Parkway at the marked crosswalk to go southbound on Naito Parkway, then westbound on SW Jefferson St. View a map of the bike detour route. 

Bus detour information: The bus stop at SW Main between First and Second avenues has been relocated temporarily to SW First Ave, between SW Madison St and SW Jefferson St. Routes affected include 4, 10, 14, 15 and 30. For updates on TriMet service, check for service Alerts at trimet.org or call 503-238-RIDE (7433). View a map of the temporary bus stop location.

First and Main Before Car Screen Shot

As this video shows, pavement in very poor condition makes it challenging to drive a car on SW Main Street, where one of the busiest bike routes in North America enters downtown Portland. (Video by Belen Herrera, Portland Bureau of Transportation.)

(SW Main St by car: See VIDEO from PBOT's YouTube Channel)

About the Fixing Our Streets Program

The Fixing Our Streets program is the result of the passage of Measure 26-173, a 10-cent tax on motor vehicle fuels and Portland’s first local funding source dedicated to street repair and traffic safety projects. Passed on May 17, 2016, Measure 26-173 will raise an estimated $64 million over four years. PBOT will invest this money in a wide variety of street improvement and safety projects across the entire city. Fixing Our Streets will help PBOT expand preventive street maintenance that saves money and prevents potholes. It will support our work to make it safer for children to walk to school. It will allow us to build more sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights and bike lanes. The Portland City Council also unanimously passed a Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, for vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, which will also fund the Fixing Our Streets program.

News Release: Commissioner Dan Saltzman and PBOT join the Chinese American Citizens Alliance to dedicate new plaque commemorating the contributions of Portland's early Chinese settlers

(September 15, 2017) Today, Commissioner Dan Saltzman and PBOT Director Leah Treat joined representatives of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge and members of Portland's Chinese American community to dedicate a new plaque in the heart of the city's original Chinatown. The plaque, a gift to the city from the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge, commemorates the contributions of Portland's early Chinese settlers. 

old chinatown plaque

Between 1863 and 1900, there were over 5,000 Chinese living, working and doing business on SW 2nd Avenue between Taylor and Burnside, the City's original Chinatown. The plaque, designed by urban designer Suenn Ho, recognizes the contributions of these early settlers and memorializes their history for future generations.

"The Chinese American community has a long and storied history in Portland," said Commissioner Dan Saltzman. "The plaque commemorates this rich history and we deeply appreciate this gift to Portland."

chinatown plaque

“Our streets are one of our largest public spaces. At PBOT, we want these spaces to enhance our neighborhoods and serve our communities,” said PBOT Director Leah Treat. “So we were very happy to support this project. The plaque is a beautiful way to mark the significant contributions of past generations of Chinese Americans to our city and preserve this rich history for Portlanders and visitors alike.” 

“I would like to quote Alan Spears of National Park Conservation Association who said, ‘The absence of our people in the historical landscape of our country is in itself a civil rights matter,’ said Helen Ying, Portland Lodge Board Director and Old Town Chinatown Community Association Chair.  “We are simply elated to gift the bronze plaque to the City and mark the history and contributions of the Chinese American community to Portland."  Betty Jean Lee, Portland Lodge Board Director, added, "It has taken over a century to finally have the first Chinese community in Oregon documented. Now we can share it with the whole world.”

The plaque was installed by PBOT Maintenance and Operations personnel and can be seen on the corner of SW 2nd Avenue and Pine Street.

 

 About the Portland Bureau of Transportation: PBOT is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation.

About the Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge: The Chinese American Citizens Alliance Portland Lodge is a chapter of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance National Lodge. C.A.C.A. National was founded in 1895 in San Francisco against the backdrop of rampant racial discrimination toward Chinese Americans. The Portland chapter was established in 1921. It has a three-fold mission to develop leadership, service the community and promote civil rights.

 PBOT CACA logos

Traffic Advisory: Street improvements on SE Holgate Boulevard from SE 41st Avenue to SE 43rd Avenue, September 14-19

(September 13, 2017)  – The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that street improvements on SE Holgate Boulevard from SE 41st Avenue to SE 43rd Avenue will require lane closures beginning Thursday, September 14 and continuing through Tuesday, September 19, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. each work day.

The lane closures will allow crews to grind and pave .26 lane miles of pavement.

Streets with ground down surfaces are open for travel. Lane closures are only in effect during project hours. Access will be maintained for businesses and residents during the project.

The traveling public is advised to expect delays while repairs are being made. We ask the public to travel cautiously, observe all lane closures and directions by reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.

This work is weather-dependent and the schedule may change.

News Blog: Visit PBOT's online open house to learn about the Bicycle Parking Code Update

examples of bike parking

Examples of different types of bike parking currently offered in Portland. Photos by Portland Bureau of Transportation.

(Sept. 12, 2017) It’s been 20 years since the City of Portland’s Bicycle Parking Code was written and adopted. At the time, the city’s bicycle commute mode split was only 1.2 percent. Today that number has quadrupled to 7 percent, making Portland the city with the highest bike commute rate among major cities in the United States. With that in mind, the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has been working with a stakeholder advisory committee for the past year and a half on an update to the Bicycle Parking Code requirements, in Title 33. The code language regulates the required amount, location, and design of visitor (short-term) and resident/commuter (long-term) bicycle parking spaces for new and redeveloped buildings in Portland. It is our goal that this update will bring our bicycle parking code up to current standards and to help ensure there is adequate, safe and convenient parking for people who ride a bicycle around Portland.

The Bicycle Parking Stakeholder Advisory Committee is comprised of representatives from the development community, bicycle advocates, Portland neighborhoods, Transportation Management Associations, and partner City bureaus, including Bureau of Development Services and Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The committee provides direction and recommendations to the PBOT Director, and subsequently, to other City Bureaus who will write the actual code language during the next phase of the project.

"Adequate, convenient and usable parking for a variety of bikes and cyclists is an important enabler for the higher bicycle mode shares called for in all our key plans,” said Chris Smith, a member of the Bicycle Parking Stakeholder Advisory Committee.

Over the last 18 months, the stakeholder advisory committee developed a set of recommendations that will be considered in the formal code update process. These recommendations include:

  • Update the amount of required short- and long-term bicycle parking to align with City goals
  • Increase flexibility in projects, including: 1) The allowance for reduced spacing for rack placement and inclusion of space-saving rack design and 2) a hierarchy of bicycle parking location standards and guidance
  • Inclusion of standards to address the usability and accessibility of bicycle racks for all users
  • Increase long-term bicycle parking security standards

If you are interested in diving deeper into the specific details of these recommendations and provide your feedback, visit the Bicycle Parking Online Open House. The open house will be available through Monday, September 25.

Otherwise, if you have any questions about the Bicycle Parking Code Update Project, please contact Liz Hormann, elizabeth.hormann@portlandoregon.gov, or 503-823-5086.