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Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

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TSP programs

In June 2016 the ten citywide programs below were adopted by City Council into the Portland Transportation System Plan Major Projects list.  Each program is a group of similar small-scale investments, generally under $500,000 each.  Citywide Programs help the public and staff understand, track and promote small-scale transportation investments, which can be quite effective, but are often challenging to fund.  Programs are primarily funded from scarce City of Portland General Transportation Revenue (GTR) allocated through the Capital Improvement Plan.

Each program has a project “reference list” of small-scale investments, linked below.  Unlike Major Projects, which are listed individually in the TSP, only the ten Programs are listed in the TSP. Projects on the program reference lists are evaluated using the Transportation System Plan criteria to establish program investment priorities.  Reference lists are primarily drawn from adopted plans and strategies.  Several reference lists are incomplete and will be updated over time as new plans and strategies are adopted. Some of these programs incorporate elements of previous programs within the City of Portland, while others are new programs. 

Pedestrian Network Completion Program

Gaps and deficiencies in Portland's pedestrian network present significant barriers to pedestrians. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe walking as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the pedestrian network is improved. Example projects include sidewalk gap infill, sidewalk improvements, safer shoulders, shared streets, pathways, trails, crossing improvements, wayfinding improvements, accessibility improvements, and signal modifications. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Pedestrian Districts.

Bikeway Network Completion Program

Gaps and deficiencies in Portland's bikeway network present significant barriers to bicyclists. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe bicycling as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the bikeway network is improved. Example projects include new bike lanes and sharrows, improvements to existing bikeways, wayfinding improvements, colored bike boxes and lanes, and signal modifications. This program will coordinate with paving projects to ensure that new striping designs are developed ahead of time and implemented in conjunction with paving. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Bicycle Districts.

Neighborhood Greenways Program

The Neighborhood Greenway system provides a network of safe and comfortable pedestrian/bicycle priority routes on low-volume, low-speed streets. The Neighborhood Greenway network will be improved and expanded over time through inexpensive treatments that lower speeds, reduce automobile volumes, create safer crossings of busy streets, and provide wayfinding. Example project elements include speed bumps, sharrows, signage, diverters, curb ramps, lighting, and improved crossings.

High Crash Corridor Program

High Crash Corridors are streets in Portland with a high concentration of crashes. The High Crash Corridor program uses relatively inexpensive education, enforcement and engineering solutions to address crash problems in a short period of time. Example projects include improved crossings, lane reorganizations, curb extensions, median islands, speed reader boards, and speed/crosswalk enforcement.

Safe Routes to School Program

Portland Safe Routes to School is a partnership of the City of Portland, schools, neighborhoods, community organizations and agencies that advocates for and implements programs that make walking and biking around our neighborhoods and schools fun, easy, safe and healthy for all students and families while reducing our reliance on cars. The Portland Safe Routes to School program currently provides Education, Encouragement, Engineering, Enforcement, and Evaluation in an Equitable manner (6 ‘E's) to support students in schools to be safe, have fun, grow healthy and get there.

Transit Priority Program

Improve transit speed, reliability, safety, and access along major transit corridors. Example projects include sidewalk infill, crossing improvements, stop improvements, stop consolidation or relocation, signal priority, queue jumps, and transit-only lanes. The program will coordinate with TriMet and other transit agencies to identify and implement these improvements.

Freight Priority Program

Improve freight speed, reliability, safety, and access along major freight routes. Example projects include signal priority, freight-only lanes, queue jumps, loading zones, and turning radius improvements. The program will coordinate with the Port of Portland and other freight-related organizations to identify and implement these improvements.

Transportation System Management Program

Transportation System Management (TSM) seeks to identify improvements to enhance the capacity of existing system through operational improvements.  Through better management and operation of existing transportation facilities, these techniques are designed to improve traffic flow, air quality, and movement of vehicles and goods, as well as enhance system accessibility and safety. Example projects include corridor signal timing, electronic message boards, variable speed limits, traveler information services, traffic cameras, bluetooth readers, and other intelligent transportation system (ITS) elements.

Transportation & Parking Demand Management Program

Transportation & Parking Demand Management (TDM) seeks to better utilize existing capacity in the transportation system and parking supply by reducing single-occupant automobile trips through demand management strategies. This is achieved by encouraging people through education, outreach, incentives and pricing to choose other modes, share rides, travel outside peak times, and telecommute, among other methods. TDM program elements include SmartTrips outreach, TDM Plan requirements for new development, and parking management planning and implementation. TDM is often implemented in partnerships with community organizations, neighborhood and business associations, developers and property managers.

Alternative Street Design Program

Many streets in the City of Portland do not meet full City standards. Unimproved and substandard streets cause safety, access and mobility issues for all users and fail to manage stormwater runoff. The Alternative Street Design Program will plan and implement lower-cost alternative design treatments that enhance safety, access, and mobility when funds are lacking for more extensive upgrades. Ideally, these design treatments would be concurrent with stormwater improvements. Example projects include “shared street” improvements to gravel streets, new connections through undeveloped rights-of-way, improvements to substandard paved streets, and the addition of safer shoulders to busier streets. The program could be funded by a combination of Local Improvement Districts, development impact fees, local transportation funds (e.g. Our Streets), Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) stormwater funds, and other grant and community investment opportunities.