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The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Water Bureau

From forest to faucet, we deliver the best drinking water in the world.

Customer Service: 503-823-7770

GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

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Love your throne on World Toilet Day

Can you imagine life without a toilet? FACT: 4.2 billion people live without safely managed sanitation[i]. It’s easy to take that porcelain throne for granted, but toilets and sewers are essential for public health.

November 19th (today!) is World Toilet Day, a worldwide effort to raise awareness about barriers to clean water and sanitation. At home, it’s a good reminder to appreciate your toilet.  Here are a few ideas:

  1. CHECK your toilet for leaks twice a year. Toilets leaks can waste thousands of gallons per month! (No one wants to      see that utility bill!) To check for leaks, add 10 drops of food coloring inside your toilet tank and wait 10 minutes. If the dye color shows up in your toilet bowl, you have a leak.
  2. REPAIR leaks. Check out this short video on how to repair a leaky toilet from our partners at the Regional Water Providers Consortium.
  3. REPLACE older toilets and get a $50 rebate. Older toilets can use up to four times more water per flush. The Portland Water Bureau currently offers a $50 rebate for replacing an old toilet or urinal with a WaterSense-labeled high-efficiency model. Commercial, residential and multifamily properties are eligible. The old toilet or urinal MUST be recycled at an approved recycling center. For complete rebate details, visit portlandoregon.gov/water/rebate.

Learn more about toilets and how to save water at home on November 23rd at Saving Water Makes Cents! This FREE workshop is offered in English and Spanish at Fix-it Fair. We love talking about toilets. After all, at 24% of indoor water use, toilets are the biggest water hogs in your home!  This 45-minute workshop covers simple repairs, how a toilet works, checking for leaks and more.  

Questions? Get in touch at conserve@portlandoregon.gov or 503 823-4527.

TRAFFIC ADVISORY: 11/18/19 Water Main Repair Reduces Traffic to One Lane in Both Directions on Naito between Market and Harrison Streets

Portland Water Bureau crews are responding to a water main break on Southwest Naito Parkway, between Market and Harrison streets.

To assess and repair the damaged water pipe, traffic is confined to one lane in each direction on Southwest Naito Parkway between Market and Harrison streets through the Monday evening commute.

The pipe is a 16-size-inch cast iron pipe from 1959.

Four connections on Naito Parkway (three irrigation-only lines) may be out of service while the main is repaired.

The traveling public is reminded to stay alert and use caution as traffic may suddenly slow or stop. To avoid traffic delays, motorists are encouraged to use alternate routes around the work site.

The Portland Water Bureau’s Maintenance & Construction crews are ready to respond to emergencies, including water main breaks, 24-hours a day, seven days a week. On average, crews respond to 200 main breaks a year. 

Nov. 15, 2019: Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring. Monitoring results were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50-liters sampled daily, between Sunday, November 10 and Wednesday, November 13, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the sample collected on Nov. 10. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Nov. 11, Nov. 12 or Nov. 13. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Nov. 1, 2019.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

Nov. 8, 2019: Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring. Monitoring results were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the six 50-liter samples collected between Thursday, October 31 and Wednesday, November 6, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the sample collected on Nov. 1. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Oct. 31, or Nov. 3 through Nov. 6. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Oct. 30, 2019.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

About Cryptosporidium

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

More Information

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.