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Portland Water Bureau

From forest to faucet, we deliver the best drinking water in the world.

GENERAL INFORMATION: 503-823-7404

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 600, Portland, OR 97204

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Join Our Team: Laboratory Analytical Specialist

If you're interested in joining an award-winning public utility where employees thrive on the pride of delivering a life-essential product with world class customer service, the Portland Water Bureau might be just the place for you.

The Water Bureau is a recognized leader in the utility industry. We've achieved this success by investing in the very best people and empowering them to find new and better ways to meet our customer's needs.

The Water Bureau currently employs approximately 560 people. All current job postings with the City of Portland are posted online, and updated weekly. We are an equal opportunity employer that values diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Current Opportunity at the Water Bureau

Position   Emp. Type   Salary   Closing Date/Time Join Our Team 
Laboratory Analytical Specialist Full Time $27.68 - $36.76 Hourly Mon. 9/4/17 4:30 PM Pacific Time Apply Here!

All completed applications for this position must be submitted by the closing time on the closing date and hour of this recruitment. Emailed or faxed applications will not be accepted.

Work at Water brochure Learn More About the Water Bureau

Questions 

For more information regarding career opportunities at the Water Bureau, contact (503) 823-3515 or e-mail.

4 Things You Should Know Before the Solar Eclipse

Solar eclipse glasses GIFHave you heard? Apparently, there’s a solar eclipse happening on Monday.

Some call it the apocalypse. Others are naming their babies after it. When a total solar eclipse happened in 2015, Zayne Malik left One Direction. We’re not saying that's the entire cause of One Direction’s demise (only 80–90 percent, we think), but it is still very important that you prepare yourself for what madness Monday may bring.

From traffic jams to gas shortages to calling in the Oregon National Guard, the amount of news coverage of the upcoming celestial event has overshadowed (heh, get it?) any other news story in the last several weeks.

But there’s a few more things we’d like to cram into your brain about this otherworldly event.

1. The Water Bureau is Pitching In

When the media calls, it’s all hands on deck. Monday’s eclipse will bring with it a flurry of news requests, service coordination needs, and skilled emergency management experts on the ground to ensure everyone has the chance to witness Monday’s event safely. Plus, the eclipse event is the perfect way for Oregon agencies to come together to test emergency preparedness plans.

In the spirit of coordinating resources between local and state agencies, the Water Bureau’s Public Information Officer Jaymee Cuti will be in Salem helping local and state agencies monitor eclipse traffic, distribute information to the media and local news agencies, and help things go smoothly.

Thanks, Jaymee!

Aerial view of Powell Butte2. Don’t Drive the Butte

Staying in town on Monday? Looking for a good viewing point to see the eclipse?

Powell Butte Nature Park is located in East Portland along Powell Blvd. and plays an important part of Portland's water system. It also may seem like a great place to catch a view of Monday’s event.

To reduce traffic congestion in the area, the Water Bureau will be closing the vehicle access gates to the Butte on Sunday night and will reopen at 2 p.m. on Monday. Walk to the Butte, just don’t drive! And if you’re walking, please be respectful of the residents that live nearby.

Take what you bring. Stay on marked trails. And don’t forget your non-recalled eclipse glasses. Just take them with you when you leave.

3. Traveling for the Eclipse? Bring Water!

If you’re planning on road-tripping for the solar eclipse, don’t forget to pack extra supplies. Many small towns will be overrun with eclipse event goers, so it makes sense that many shops will run out of supplies sooner than you can ask, “Why's water $5 a bottle?”

Do yourself a favor. Pack supplies like food, water, and first-aid kits.

And don’t forget water. Bring lots of water. Because nobody needs to pay $5 per bottle when – thanks to Bull Run – we’ve got the good stuff for just under 2 cents a gallon.

4. Arrive Early, Stay Put, Leave Late

Oregon will be the first state to view the solar eclipse as it crosses the United States. Learn how to prepare yourself, and what you can expect, with these resources from City of Portland agencies.

Join Portland Water at the Jade District Night Market

Mark your August calendars to join the Portland Water Bureau at the third annual Jade District Night Market.

Water Bureau employees will be on hand to:

  • Answer your water-related questions, offer information on how the Water Bureau can help with bill assistance
  • Discuss convenient ways to pay and manage your sewer-water bill
  • Give tips on using water efficiently and cost effectively

When: Saturdays, August 19 and 26
Time: 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Location: Portland Community College Southeast Campus, 2305 SE 82nd Ave.

Jade Night MarketThe Jade District Night Market events are free, family-friendly, and include retail and food vendors and live entertainment. The Market aims to create community on Southeast 82nd Avenue by bringing local business owners together, and draws the larger Portland community to the multi-ethnic neighborhood.

The Jade District includes the area surrounding Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Division Street. The district was designated by the Prosper Portland as a Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative district in 2011. This public/private partnership transform underserved commercial districts in east Portland into engines of economic growth without displacing the communities that reside there.

July 2017: Washington Park Reservoir Improvements Project Monthly Update

Take the Washington Park Shuttle

Washington Park Free Shuttle

Parking in the park can be a challenge, even without construction. Fortunately, Washington Park offers a free shuttle that provides transportation to all the park’s attractions.

The shuttle runs every 15 minutes and takes about 30 minutes to do the entire loop. From May to September there is daily service from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. You can access the shuttle from the MAX stop, as well as walk, roll, or bus to any of the various stops to easily hop on and tour the park.

Learn more and see the stops at explorewashingtonpark.org/getting-here.

Park users are encouraged to move safely around the park and its attractions. Please watch carefully for detours and signage, and follow direction from flaggers. Visit trimet.org and explorewashingtonpark.org for transit options.

Construction continues on a Portland Water Bureau long term project to improve and updates the Washington Park reservoir at 2403 SW Jefferson Street. This project brings the city into compliance with federal and state mandates, seismically strengthens key water infrastructure on Portland’s west side. The improvements also help ensure a healthy, resilient, and secure water system.

Upper Reservoir

A new 12.4-million gallon, seismically reinforced, below ground reservoir will be constructed in the same footprint of existing Reservoir 3 (the upper one) with a reflecting pool/water feature on top. The engineers preserved the historic drinking water function, and improved the reservoir to withstand ongoing landslide encroachment or other potentially catastrophic effects from a major earthquake.

Once completed, the upper reservoir will supply water to Portland’s west side and serve:

  • 360,000 people
  • All downtown businesses and residents
  • Twenty schools
  • Five hospital complexes
  • Sixty parks
  • Landmarks such as the Oregon Zoo

Lower Reservoir

The existing Reservoir 4 (the lower one) is disconnected from the public drinking water system and will boast a lowland wildlife habitat area and bioswale. Additionally, a reflecting pool will be constructed in the basin.

Schedule

Construction started September 12, 2016 and is anticipated to proceed through 2020. A pause is scheduled to occur from 2020 to 2022 to allow soils to settle for greater stability and resiliency. From 2022 to 2024, construction of interpretive features, including the two reflecting pools and surface features, will conclude the project.

July 2017 Accomplishments

  • Reservoir 4 filling placement is intermittent and dependent on excavation shoring wall work. Begin installation of storm drain piping.
  • Washington Park updatesReservoir 3: Backfill and construction of the toe block continues.
  • Work inside Gatehouse 4: Continue with piping, interior stairs and mid-level decking installation.
  • Gatehouse 3: Abatement and removal of the wet well inside Gatehouse 3 will begin in August.
  • Shoring wall construction along Sacajawea – Two shoring walls – one temporary and one permanent – are being built to protect the site from earth movement and allow for construction of the underground reservoir. The temporary wall has been completed and construction of the permanent wall has begun.
  • Yard piping: Installation of waterline, storm and sanitary piping behind Pump Station 1 and Dam 3 will begin in August.
  • Work inside Pump Station 3: Begin seismic upgrade work.
  • Single large truck deliveries carrying materials for the construction of the permanent retaining wall will take place Monday mornings between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. through the month of August.
  • Yard Piping: Installation of waterline piping along Madison Trail has begun. This will cause a temporary closure of the trail.
  • Erosion control at the site is ongoing.

For More Information

Please contact us with questions, concerns, or to change your preferences to receive project updates. For questions or concerns regarding the Washington Park Reservoir:

Safety is Our Top Priority

The traffic control plan in place has been approved by the Portland Bureau of Transportation. The Water Bureau will be conducting evaluations and adjusting traffic flow as conditions require. The Water Bureau is working with Portland Parks & Recreation, Explore Washington Park, neighborhood associations, and the community to gather on-the-ground feedback and determine if changes are necessary. Please provide your traffic and signage feedback by phone, e-mail, or on the dedicated webpage.

Activity and Impacts

Until March 2018, major earthwork will occur along with the construction of shoring walls necessary for construction of the new underground reservoir. Work during this stage will cause temporary impacts to traffic, parking, and TriMet bus service.

 

Current to March 2018

IMPACTS

Road Closures

  • SW Sacajawea Boulevard is closed to all vehicle and bike traffic and pedestrian use from the intersection of SW Sacajawea Boulevard/SW Rose Park Road/SW Wright Road to SW Park Place.
  • SW Sherwood Boulevard is closed to all vehicle and bike traffic and pedestrian use from SW Sacajawea Boulevard to the Soccer Field.
  • SW Sherwood Boulevard is closed to all vehicle traffic from the Soccer Field to SW Kingston Avenue.
  • SW Sherwood Boulevard sidewalk is open for pedestrian use and bike traffic from SW Kingston Avenue to the Soccer Field.

Tour Buses, Free Park Shuttle

  • Tour buses and the free park shuttle are allowed access onto SW Sherwood Boulevard at SW Kingston Drive for turnaround at the Soccer Field. No unauthorized vehicles will be permitted on SW Sherwood Blvd.

Traffic Flow Reversal

  • The flow of traffic is reversed on SW Lewis Clark Way.
  • One-way traffic travels SW Lewis Clark

Multi-Use Shared Path

  • A designated path separate from vehicles is now available on SW Lewis Clark Way.
  • Pedestrians and cyclists can use the path to travel both in and out of the park on SW Lewis Clark Way.
  • Cyclists are required to walk and not ride bicycles on the path.

Parking

  • All parking spaces are closed on SW Lewis Clark Way, SW Sacajawea Blvd., and SW Sherwood Blvd.

Trails

  • Madison Ct. Trail: Pedestrians and cyclists can enter and exit the Madison Ct. Trail on SW Madison St. and SW Sacajawea Blvd. The trail will be closed intermittently; watch for detour signage.
  • Mac Trail: Open, not affected by project work. Continued access via SW Sherwood Blvd. and SW Sacajawea Blvd.

TriMet Bus Service

  • TriMet Bus Line 63 - Washington Park/Arlington Heights is detoured.
  • The following stops are closed: 6177, 4346, and 4343
  • Check trimet.org for updates.

PARK ENTRANCES

PARK EXITS

  • W Burnside Rd. to SW Tichner Dr.
  • SW Canyon Rd. to SW Knights Blvd.
  • SW Fairview Blvd. to SW Knights Blvd.
  • SW Fairview Blvd. to SW Knights Blvd.
  • SW Knights Blvd. to SW Canyon Rd.
  • SW Lewis Clark Way to SW Park Pl.
  • SW Tichner Dr. to W Burnside Rd.
 
  • SW Fairview Blvd. to SW Knights Blvd.
  • SW Knights Blvd. to SW Canyon Rd.
  • SW Lewis Clark Way to SW Park Pl.
  • SW Tichner Dr. to W Burnside Rd.

 

 

5 Summer Watering Tips: Outdoor Irrigation Made Easy

When it comes to your outdoor spaces, do you ever just turn on the water and hope for the best?

If you’re not sure about timing and the best way to water, no shame! We’ve all been there.

Leave the water-guilt behind with these five tips for a water efficient landscape.  

Couple watering lawn in their pajamas1. Water in the morning.

Start your day with watering to allow broad leaf plants (especially vegetables) a chance to dry off in the afternoon.

Not a morning person? Evening is a good second choice and better than mid-day. Try for after 6 p.m.

2. More water, less often.

Give your plants a good soak to encourage deep root development.

Oregon State University Extension recommends that established garden plants get a thorough watering every five to seven days. If you see water running off, it is likely because the soil can’t absorb the water that quickly. One way to help prevent runoff is to split up your watering time with breaks that allow for water to seep into the ground in-between cycles. Use the weekly watering number, an estimate for how much water your landscape needs based on weather and zip code.

3. Right plant, right place. 

Use this summer to keep track of which plants need more water and plan to group those plants next year. Placing plants with similar moisture needs in the same area makes it easier to ensure they get the water they need without overwatering.

4. Use a spray nozzle with an automatic shut off. 

If you water by hand, use an automatic nozzle on your hose. This will save you from sprinting back to your faucet in between watering different parts of your yard.  Need a spray nozzle? Drop us a line and we’ll send one off while supplies last. Email us at conserve@portlandoregon.gov or call 503 823-4527.

Lawn sprinkler5. Inspect and redirect automatic systems.

If you’re using an in-ground automatic irrigation system, regularly inspect and repair broken heads. Redirect sprinkler heads that are spraying onto pavement. If you plan to purchase an irrigation controller or sprinkler heads, you may be able to save some cash with irrigation rebates! Learn about how to qualify here.

And don’t forget to check for high or low pressure. If your sprinklers are misting, the pressure is too high.  If you see a short dome-shaped spray, your pressure is too low.

Get a Free Irrigation Consultation

Take advantage of the irrigation consultation pilot program and get custom recommendations from a landscape professional – for free. Consultations include a walk-through of your system followed by an easy to read set of customized recommendations to improve your watering.  Contact us at 503-823-4527 or conserve@portlandoregon.gov, to determine if you are eligible for a free irrigation consultation.

For more ways to make every drop count in your landscape – from planning a water-smart landscape to getting outdoor irrigation rebates – with our Outdoor Water Efficiency resources.